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The Volcanoes of
Lewis and Clark
April 21, 1806
Up the Columbia - Celilo Falls to the Deschutes
 
Home
The Volcanoes of Lewis and Clark

Map of the Journey
Volcanoes, Basalt Plateaus, Major Rivers, etc.

The Volcanoes
Mount Adams, Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, Mount Rainier, and Mount St. Helens

CALENDAR of the Journey
October 1805 to June 1806

Along the Journey
Pacific Northwest Maps - Columbia River, Volcanoes, Flood Basalts, Missoula Floods, Geology, etc.

The Corps of Discovery
The Journey of Lewis and Clark

About the Reference Materials
The Journals, Biddle/Allen, DeVoto, Gass, Moulton, Topo Maps, and others

USGS Lewis and Clark Links
Links to USGS Websites highlighting the Lewis and Clark Journey

Resources
Publications Referenced and Websites Visited


PREVIOUS

April 18-20
Up the Columbia, The Dalles and "The Long Narrows"
April 21

Up the Columbia,
Celilo Falls to the Deschutes

"Great Falls of the Columbia", Celilo Locks and Canal, Celilo Falls and Wishram (Washington), Mount Hood, Deschutes River, Deschutes River State Recreation Area, Miller Island
CONTINUE

April 22
Up the Columbia, Deschutes to the John Day
 

On October 7, 1805, Lewis and Clark and the "Corps of Discovery" began their journey down the Clearwater River and into the volcanics of the Pacific Northwest. The Corps travelled from the Clearwater to the Snake and down the "Great Columbia", finally reaching the Pacific Ocean on November 15, 1805. Along the journey they encountered the lava flows of the Columbia Plateau, river channels carved by the great "Missoula Floods", and the awesome beauty of five Cascade Range volcanoes.

Map, Lewis and Clark in the Pacific Northwest, click for brief
                         summary
[Click map for brief summary about the area]


 
Heading for Home - April 1806
Up the Columbia - Celilo Falls to the Deschutes
 

Lewis and Clark's camp of April 19 and April 20, 1806, was on the Washington side of the Columbia River, upstream of today's The Dalles Dam.

Monday, April 21, 1806
We had intended setting out at the same time, but one of our horses broke loose during the night, and we were under the necessity of sending several men in search of him. ...... At ten o'clock the men returned with the horse, and soon after, an Indian who had promised to go with us as far as the Chopunnish, came with two horses, one of which he politely offered to carry our baggage. We therefore loaded nine horses, and giving the tenth to Bratton, who was still too sick to walk, about ten o'clock left the village ......
"... at 12 oClock Capt Lewis and party came up from the Skillutes Village with 9 horses packed and one which bratten who was yet to weak to walk, rode, and soon after the two small canoes also loaded with the residue of the baggage which could not be taken on horses. we had every thing imediately taken above the falls [Celilo Falls] ..." [Clark, April 21, 1806]

Lewis and Clark are on the Washington side of the Columbia passing the area of "The Great Falls of the Columbia", which they had to portage in October of 1805. Today Celilo Falls is under the waters of Lake Celilo, the reservoir behind The Dalles Dam. This area now is a prime sailboard area, and views of the river seen at Celilo Park, Oregon, and Wishram, Washington. Mount Hood, Oregon can be seen along this stretch of the Columbia.


Along the Journey - April 21, 1806
Celilo Falls, ca.1940

Celilo Falls ("Great Falls of the Columbia"):
Celilo Falls was known as the "Great Falls of the Columbia". The Columbia River cut into basalt rock to create a constriction of the river with a twenty-foot falls followed by a mile of narrow, channeled rapids with a drop of eight feet in river elevation. The Lewis and Clark expedition arrived at the "Great Falls of the Columbia" in late October, 1805, and were forced to portage around to continue on downriver. In the spring of 1806 they had to pass through the falls again on their journey home. The Celilo Falls were drowned in 1957 with the construction of The Dalles Dam. -- Washington State University Library Collections Website, 2002, Washington State Historical Society Website, 2002


Map, 1814, Great Falls of the Columbia, click to enlarge Map, 1887, The Dalles vicinity, click to enlarge Map, 1888, Celilo Falls and Vicinity, click to enlarge Map, 1983, Celilo Falls, click to enlarge Map, 1983, Celilo Falls, Wishram, click to enlarge Image, ca.1879-1909, Celilo Falls, click to enlarge Image, 1900, Celilo Falls, click to enlarge Image, ca.1913, Upper Celilo Falls, click to enlarge Image, ca.1937, Celilo Falls, click to enlarge Image, Celilo Falls, click to enlarge Penny Postcard, ca.1940, Basalt of Celilo Falls, click to enlarge Image, 1946, Celilo Falls area, click to enlarge Image, 2003, Celilo Park, Wishram, and Mount Hood
  1. 1814 Map, Great Falls of the Columbia. (Click to enlarge). This map is found in Travels to the source of the Missouri River and across the American continent to the Pacific Ocean : performed by order of the government of the United States, in the years 1804, 1805, and 1806, by Captains Lewis and Clarke. Published from the official report, 1814. -- Washington State University Library Archives Website, 2002
  2. 1887 Map (section of original), Columbia River at The Dalles. (Click to enlarge). Original Map: The Columbia River from Celilo to the mouth showing locations of the salmon fisheries, 1887. Scale ca. 1:375,000, Relief shown by hachures. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Office, G.P.O. 1888. University of Washington Archives #UW128. -- University of Washington Library Archives Website, 2002
  3. 1888 Map (section of original), Columbia River at Celilo Falls. (Click to enlarge). Original Map: Map of Columbia River from The Dalles to Celilo, Oregon, 1880. Scale 1:30,000. Relief shown by contours. Shows a section of the Columbia River, including fall and rapids, water gauges, and "basaltic" region. Original map is reduced from sheet 1 and 2, survey of 1879-1880, Published G.P.O. 1889. University of Washington Archives #UW66. -- University of Washington Library Archives Website, 2002
  4. 1983 Map, Celilo Falls. (Click to enlarge). Office of Coast Surveys, Historical Maps and Charts, Lake Celilo, 1983, Chart#18533, 1:20,000. -- NOAA Office of Coast Survey Website, 2004
  5. 1983 Map, Celilo Falls and Wishram. (Click to enlarge). Office of Coast Surveys, Historical Maps and Charts, Lake Celilo, 1983, Chart#18533, 1:20,000. -- NOAA Office of Coast Survey Website, 2004
  6. ca.1879-1909, A scene in the region served by the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company between 1879-1909. (Click to enlarge). Oregon State Archives Photograph, Salem Public Library Collection. Photograph Date: 1879-1909. -- Oregon State Archives Website, 2002
  7. 1900, Celilo Falls. (Click to enlarge). Celilo Falls on the Columbia, by Benjamin Gifford, 1900. Oregon Historical Society #OrHi89622. -- Oregon Historical Society Archives Website, 2002
  8. ca.1913, Upper Celilo Falls. (Click to enlarge). Photo by Albert Henry Barnes, ca.1913. University of Washington A.H. Barnes Collection #BAR010. -- University of Washington Library Archives, 2003
  9. ca.1937, Fishing at Celilo Falls. (Click to enlarge). The men stand on platforms and fish for the salmon with nets on long poles. Overhead are the cables used to transport people in a small cable car to an island in the river. The Celilo Falls are in the background. Photographer: Ralph Gifford. Photograph Date: ca. 1937. Oregon State Archives, Salem Public Library Collection # OHDG211. -- Oregon State Archives Website, 2002
  10. Native Americans fishing off platforms at Celilo Falls on the Columbia River, Oregon. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Historic Library #700-07. -- U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Website, 2002
  11. ca.1940, Penny Postcard, Basalt at Celilo Falls. (Click to enlarge). "Cecilo (sic) Falls from Columbia River Highway, Oregon". #858, Wesley Andrews Co., Portland, Oregon. -- L.Topinka private collection, 2003, used with permission
  12. 1946, Horse seining for salmon on the Columbia River near Celilo Falls. (Click to enlarge). The horses are used to pull the heavy nets. Oregon State Archives Oregon State Highways Division Photograph #OHD2716. Photographer: Rosin. Photograph Date: September 10, 1946. -- Oregon State Archives Website, 2003
  13. 2003, Looking downstream on the Columbia River at the Celilo Falls area. (Click to enlarge). Celilo Park, Oregon is on the left and Wishram, Washington is on the right. Mount Hood, Oregon, is in the distance. Image from Washington State Highway 14. Copyright © 2003 Lyn Topinka, private archives, used with permission.


Celilo Canal and barge, 1953

Celilo Locks and Canal:
Prior to 1863, boats operating on the upper river above Celilo and those coming upriver to The Dalles were linked by a wagon-road portage in order to avoid the treacherous rapids. In 1863, the Oregon Steam Navigation Company completed a 13-mile iron-railed portage line along what had been known as Thompson's Portage, between The Dalles and Celilo on the Oregon shore. The Dalles - Celilo railroad and connecting river steamers operated regularly for a number of years. In October 1905, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began work on The Dalles - Celilo Canal, one of the most significant early projects of the Corps' Portland District. The 8 1/2-mile-long canal consisted of five locks, each with an eight-foot lift. The Corps completed and officially opened the canal on May 5, 1915. This canal provided passage around Celilo Falls and the Long Narrows until The Dalles Dam replaced it in 1957. The filling of the reservoir behind The Dalles Dam in March 1957 inundated the canal, ending its 40-year history. Traffic now pass through the navigation lock on the Washington shore of the Project. -- U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Website, 2002, and Center for Columbia River History Website, 2002


Image, 1914, Celilo Canal, click to enlarge Image, 1915, First two boats through Celilo Canal, click to enlarge Image, 1953, Celilo Canal, click to enlarge
  1. 1914, Celilo Canal. (Click to enlarge). This 1914 photograph shows the river before dams and reservoirs changed the flow. Oregon State Archives, Water Resources Department Records, Photographs, and Negatives, #OWR0141. -- Oregon State Archives Website, 2002
  2. 1915, First two boats through the Celilo Canal. (Click to enlarge). The Inland Empire and the J.M. Teal, Photograph Date: 1915, Photographer: "Welcome Sutdio", The Dalles, Oregon. Oregon Historical Society #95715, #2395, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center Catalogue #2001.06.16. -- Columbia Gorge Discovery Center Website, 2004
  3. 1953, Celilo Canal. (Click to enlarge). A tug is pushing a grain barge down the Canal. Oregon State Archives, Oregon Highways Division, #OHD5572. -- Oregon State Archives Website, 2002


Columbia River, Celilo Park and Wishram, 2003

Celilo Falls area and Wishram, Washington, today:
Today the Celilo Falls area has been inundated with the waters of Lake Celilo, the reservoir behind The Dalles Dam. Across from Wishram, Washington, is now Celilo Park, Oregon.


Map, 1814, Great Falls of the Columbia, click to enlarge Map, 1983, Celilo Falls, click to enlarge Map, 1983, Celilo Falls, Wishram, click to enlarge Image, 2003, Celilo Park, Wishram, and Mount Hood
  1. 1814 Map, Great Falls of the Columbia. (Click to enlarge). This map is found in Travels to the source of the Missouri River and across the American continent to the Pacific Ocean : performed by order of the government of the United States, in the years 1804, 1805, and 1806, by Captains Lewis and Clarke. Published from the official report, 1814. -- Washington State University Library Archives Website, 2002
  2. 1983 Map, Celilo Falls. (Click to enlarge). Office of Coast Surveys, Historical Maps and Charts, Lake Celilo, 1983, Chart#18533, 1:20,000. -- NOAA Office of Coast Survey Website, 2004
  3. 1983 Map, Celilo Falls and Wishram. (Click to enlarge). Office of Coast Surveys, Historical Maps and Charts, Lake Celilo, 1983, Chart#18533, 1:20,000. -- NOAA Office of Coast Survey Website, 2004
  4. 2003, Looking downstream on the Columbia River at the Celilo Falls area. (Click to enlarge). Celilo Park, Oregon is on the left and Wishram, Washington is on the right. Mount Hood, Oregon, is in the distance. Image from Washington State Highway 14. Copyright © 2003 Lyn Topinka, private archives, used with permission.


encamped at a village of Eneeshurs [Washington side of the Columbia River], consisting of nine mat huts, a little below the mouth of the Towahnahiooks [Deschutes River]. ......
"... After dinner we proceeded on about 4 miles to a village of 9 Mat Lodges of the Enesher: one of the canoes joined us, the other not haveing observed us halt continued on ..." [Clark, April 21, 1806]


Along the Journey - April 21, 1806
Deschutes River, 2003

Deschutes River:
Lewis and Clark first called the Deschutes "Clark's River" and that name appears on the route map and in their journals. Later, to avoid confusion with the previously named "Clark's Fork" [Pend Oreille River], Lewis and Clark changed the river's name to it's Indian name "Towahnahiooks," which with its various other spellings is the Chinook term for "enemies," referring to a river coming from southern Paiute Indian territory.
"... To this river, moreover, which we have hitherto called Clarke's river, which rises in the southwest mountains, we restored the name of Towahnahiooks, the name by which it is known to the Eneeshurs ..." [Clark, May 6, 1806]
In the fur trading period the French Canadians called the drainage "Riviere des Chutes," French for "river of the falls," because of its close proximity to the "La Grand Dalle de la Columbia." The tendency to simplify place names with local usage has shortened the name to "Deschutes." The Deschutes River originates on the east slope of the Cascade Mountains southwest of Bend. The river flows north through Central Oregon and enters the Columbia River at River Mile (RM) 205. The basin drains approximately 10,500 square miles and is second in size only to the Willamette River watershed in Oregon. The basin is separated into upper and lower sections, the dividing point between the sections being the Pelton/Round Butte at RM 100. The lower Deschutes River basin covers approximately 2,700 square miles and has 760 miles of perennial streams and 1,440 miles of intermittent streams. Major tributaries to the lower Deschutes River include the Warm Springs and White rivers and Shitike, Trout, Bakeoven, and Buck Hollow creeks. Nineteen high mountain lakes, six lower elevation lakes and small reservoirs, and numerous man-made or natural small ponds are also found. The lower Deschutes River basin lies in the southern portion of the Columbia Basin physiographic province. Loess, volcanic ash and pumice have been laid down during recent geologic times, with much of the original deposits of loess and ash having been eroded from the uplands and deposited along streams. The upper Deschutes River basin encompasses the upper 132 river miles of the Deschutes River and drains approximately 2,200 square miles. -- Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Website, 2004, and Washington State Historical Society Website, 2004, "Lasting Legacy".


Map, 1814, Lewis and Clark on the Columbia, click to enlarge Map, 1853, Washington and Oregon and the Columbia River, click to enlarge Map, 1854, Columbia River, Hood River to the John Day, click to enlarge Map, 1855, Columbia River, Walla Walla to Vancouver, click to enlarge Map, 1858 Military recon map, Deschutes River Vicinity, click to enlarge Map, 1859, Columbia River, Klickitat River and Fort Dalles, click to enlarge Map, 1887, The Dalles vicinity, click to enlarge Map, 1983, Miller Island and the Deschutes River, click to enlarge NASA Image, 1997, Columbia River from The Dalles to Rock Creek, click to enlarge NASA Image, 1994, Deschutes Drainage, click to enlarge Image, 1910, Junction of the Deschutes River with the Columbia, click to enlarge Image, 2003, Deschutes River
  1. 1814 Map, Lewis and Clark's map of the Columbia River (section of original). (Click to enlarge.) Shows the Deschutes River ("To-war-na-he-ooks R."). Map also includes three of the five volcanoes Lewis and Clark saw and commented on. While the journals mention the expedition seeing Mount Adams, it does not appear on their map. Mount Jefferson is just visible to the south (bottom) and Mount Rainier is to the north but off the map. From the "Nicholas Biddle/Paul Allen" 1814 publication. Original Map: "A Map of Lewis and Clark's Track, Across the Western Portion of North America, From the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean". From: History of the expedition under the command of Captains Lewis and Clark : to the sources of the Missouri, thence across the Rocky Mountains and down the river Columbia to the Pacific Ocean : performed during the years 1804-5-6 : by order of the government of the United States / prepared for the press by Paul Allen. Philadelphia : Bradford and Insskeep, 1814. Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University #upbover maps37. -- Brigham Young University, Harold B. Lee Library Website, 2004.
  2. 1853 Map, Washington and Oregon and the Columbia River, from the Clearwater River to the Snake River and down the Columbia River to the Pacific Ocean (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Includes: Clearwater River (Kooskooski), Lapwai Creek (Lapwai R.), Snake River (Saptin or Lewis R.), Columbia River (Columbia R.), Yakima River (Yakima R.), Walla Walla River (Wallawalla R.), Umatilla River (Umatilla R.), Willow Creek (Quesnells R.), John Day River (John day's R.), Deschutes River (Fall R.), Willamette River (Willammette R.), and Cowlitz River (Cowlitz R.). Original Map: "Map of California, Oregon, Washington, Utah, and New Mexico (1853)", by Thomas Cowperthwait & Co. Washington State University Archives #WSU22. -- Washington State University Library Collections Website, 2003
  3. 1853-54 Map, Columbia River, including the Hood River to John Day area (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Includes Hood River (Dog River), Klickitat River (Klikatat R.), Mill Creek (?) (Wasco Ck.), The Dalles, The Deschutes (Wanwauwie or des Chutes R.), the John Day River (Mah hah or John Day's R.), and Rock Creek (Camill Cr.). Original Map: "Rocky Mountains to Puget Sound : from explorations and surveys / made under the direction of the Hon. Jefferson Davis, Secretary of War by Isaac I. Stevens Governor of Washington Territory, 1853-4." Inset: (Supplementary sketch) Reconnaissance of the railroad route from Wallawalla to Seattle via Yak-e-mah River & Snoqualmie Pass. By A. W. Tinkham in January 1854. Drawn by J. R. P. Mechlin. 20 x 28 cm. Topographer, John Lambert, Published in Washington D.C., 1859, 1:1,200,000, Notes: From the U.S. War Department, Explorations and Surveys for a Railroad Route from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean, Topographical Maps, to Illustrate the Various Reports, U.S. Library of Congress American Memories Reference "LC Railroad Maps #156". -- U.S. Library of Congress, American Memories Website, 2004
  4. 1855 Map, Columbia River, including the Deschutes River (Fall R.) (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Original Map: "Map of Oregon and Washington Territories: showing the proposed Northern Railroad route to the Pacific Ocean, by John Disturnell, 1855. University of Washington Archives #UW155. -- University of Washington Library Collections Website, 2002
  5. 1858 Military Recon Map (section of original), Deschutes River confluence with the Columbia River. (Click to enlarge). Washington State is north (top) and Oregon is south (bottom). Miller Island is under the fold marks. "Deschutes Peak" today is called "Haystack Butte". Original Map: Map of military reconnaissance from Fort Dalles, Oregon, via Fort Wallah-Wallah, to Fort Taylor, Washington Territory, 1858. Shows approximate location of military road constructed 1859 to 1862. From: the report and maps of Captain John Mullan, United States Army G.P.O., 1863. -- Washington State University Library Archives Website, 2002
  6. 1859 Map, Columbia River, including the Klickitat River (Klikatat Riv.), Fort Dalles, and the Deschutes River (Fall River) (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Original Map: "Map Exhibiting the Routes between Fort Dalles and the Great Salt Lake", By Bvt.2d Lieut. Joseph Dixon, Topl. Engrs. From Explorations made by him while attached to the Wagon Road Expedition to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake, under the command of Capt. H.D. Wallen, 4th Inft., Compiled under the direction of Capt. Geo. Thom, Topl. Engr., from the orders of Brig. Gen. W.S. Harney commanding the Department of Oregon, 1859. Publisher: Bureau of Topog. Engineers, 1860, UU Library ID: #G4240_1859_D5., Scale: 1:1,300,000. -- University of Utah Library, J.Willard Marriott Digitized Collections Website, 2004
  7. 1887 Map (section of original), Columbia River at The Dalles, including the Deschutes River and Miller Island. (Click to enlarge). Original Map: The Columbia River from Celilo to the mouth showing locations of the salmon fisheries, 1887. Scale ca. 1:375,000, Relief shown by hachures. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Office, G.P.O. 1888. University of Washington Archives #UW128. -- University of Washington Library Archives Website, 2002
  8. 1983 Map, Miller Island and the Deschutes River (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Office of Coast Surveys, Historical Maps and Charts, Lake Celilo, 1983, Chart#18533, 1:20,000. -- NOAA Office of Coast Survey Website, 2004
  9. 1997, NASA Image, Columbia River from The Dalles to Rock Creek (Click to enlarge). View from space - northeast looking photograph of Columbia River, The Dalles Dam, John Day Dam, Miller Island, Maryhill area, Deschutes River, John Day River, and Rock Creek, 1997. The Columbia River flows upper right (east) to lower left (west). NASA Earth from Space #STS085-734-085. -- NASA Earth from Space Website, 2002
  10. 1994, NASA Image, Deschutes drainage, including Miller Island (section of original). (Click to enlarge). View from space - Columbia River and the Deschutes River drainage, west-northwest-looking, low-oblique photograph, September 1994. Miller Island is visible in the Columbia River (right side of view) at the mouth of the Deschutes River (center of view). The Cascades are the dark coloration at the top of the view. NASA Earth from Space #STS064-112-092. -- NASA Earth from Space Website, 2002
  11. 1910, Junction of the Deschutes River with the Columbia River. (Click to enlarge). Oregon Historical Society OrHi#24347, also ID#905-D, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center Catalogue #2001.05.008. -- Columbia Gorge Discovery Center Website, 2004.
  12. 2003, Deschutes River, Oregon, as seen from Washington State Highway 14. (Click to enlarge). Copyright © 2003 Lyn Topinka, private archives, used with permission.


Deschutes River State Recreation Area:
The Deschutes River State Recreation Area is a tree-shaded overnight oasis for campers. The sparkle-laden, swift green rush of the Deschutes converges with the Columbia here, and there's no better place for family outing activities like hiking, biking, camping, rafting, world-class steelhead and trout fishing and equestrian trail riding. The Deschutes, which is both a national and state scenic waterway, drops about a quarter of a mile in its final 100 miles as it twists through canyons 700 to 2,200 feet deep. -- Oregon State Parks and Recreation Website, 2002



"... We halted here two hours and then proceeded on again. The party that went by land had to leave the river, and take out to the hill a part of the way. I crossed with my canoe to the south side where there is the best water, and passed a large rock island [Miller Island] , opposite to which the Sho-sho-ne river [Deschutes River] flows in from the south. We went on till dark, and then run our small canoe among some willows, and laid down to sleep. We did not make any fire for fear the savages, who are very numerous along this part of the river, might come and rob us. ..." [Gass, April 21, 1806]


Along the Journey - April 21, 1806
Upstream tip of Miller Island, 2003

Miller Island:
Miller Island is located at the mouth of the Deschutes River. This large island was given a descriptive name, "Rock Island" as Lewis and Clark headed towards the "Great Falls of the Columbia" and their first portage of the Columbia River rapids. Known today as Miller Island, the island was probably named after an early pioneer in the region. -- Washington State Historical Society Website, 2002


Map, 1858 Military recon map, Deschutes River Vicinity, click to enlarge Map, 1859, Columbia River, Klickitat River and Fort Dalles, click to enlarge Map, 1887, The Dalles vicinity, click to enlarge Map, 1983, Miller Island and the Deschutes River, click to enlarge NASA Image, 1997, Columbia River from The Dalles to Rock Creek, click to enlarge NASA Image, 1994, Deschutes Drainage including Miller Island, click to enlarge NASA Image, 1994, Miller Island, click to enlarge Image, 2003, Upstream tip of Miller Island
  1. 1858 Military Recon Map (section of original), Deschutes River confluence with the Columbia River. (Click to enlarge). Washington State is north (top) and Oregon is south (bottom). Miller Island is under the fold marks. "Deschutes Peak" today is called "Haystack Butte". Original Map: Map of military reconnaissance from Fort Dalles, Oregon, via Fort Wallah-Wallah, to Fort Taylor, Washington Territory, 1858. Shows approximate location of military road constructed 1859 to 1862. From: the report and maps of Captain John Mullan, United States Army G.P.O., 1863. -- Washington State University Library Archives Website, 2002
  2. 1859 Map, Columbia River, including the Klickitat River (Klikatat Riv.), Fort Dalles, and the Deschutes River (Fall River) (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Original Map: "Map Exhibiting the Routes between Fort Dalles and the Great Salt Lake", By Bvt.2d Lieut. Joseph Dixon, Topl. Engrs. From Explorations made by him while attached to the Wagon Road Expedition to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake, under the command of Capt. H.D. Wallen, 4th Inft., Compiled under the direction of Capt. Geo. Thom, Topl. Engr., from the orders of Brig. Gen. W.S. Harney commanding the Department of Oregon, 1859. Publisher: Bureau of Topog. Engineers, 1860, UU Library ID: #G4240_1859_D5., Scale: 1:1,300,000. -- University of Utah Library, J.Willard Marriott Digitized Collections Website, 2004
  3. 1887 Map (section of original), Columbia River at The Dalles, including the Deschutes River and Miller Island. (Click to enlarge). Original Map: The Columbia River from Celilo to the mouth showing locations of the salmon fisheries, 1887. Scale ca. 1:375,000, Relief shown by hachures. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Office, G.P.O. 1888. University of Washington Archives #UW128. -- University of Washington Library Archives Website, 2002
  4. 1983 Map, Miller Island and the Deschutes River (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Office of Coast Surveys, Historical Maps and Charts, Lake Celilo, 1983, Chart#18533, 1:20,000. -- NOAA Office of Coast Survey Website, 2004
  5. 1997, NASA Image, Columbia River from The Dalles to Rock Creek (Click to enlarge). View from space - northeast looking photograph of Columbia River, The Dalles Dam, John Day Dam, Miller Island, Maryhill area, Deschutes River, John Day River, and Rock Creek, 1997. The Columbia River flows upper right (east) to lower left (west). NASA Earth from Space #STS085-734-085. -- NASA Earth from Space Website, 2002
  6. 1994, NASA Image, Deschutes drainage, including Miller Island (section of original). (Click to enlarge). View from space - Columbia River and the Deschutes River drainage, west-northwest-looking, low-oblique photograph, September 1994. Miller Island is visible in the Columbia River (right side of view) at the mouth of the Deschutes River (center of view). The Cascades are the dark coloration at the top of the view. NASA Earth from Space #STS064-112-092. -- NASA Earth from Space Website, 2002
  7. 1994, NASA Image, Miller Island (section of original). (Click to enlarge). View from space - Columbia River, with the Deschutes River and Miller Island, west-northwest-looking, low-oblique photograph, September 1994. Miller Island is located in the Columbia River at the mouth of the Deschutes River. Washington State is to the right of the Columbia (north) and Oregon is to the left (south). The ridge visible on the Washington side of the Columbia is Columbia Hills. NASA Earth from Space #STS064-112-092. -- NASA Earth from Space Website, 2002
  8. 2003, Upstream tip of Miller Island. (Click to enlarge). Copyright © 2003 Lyn Topinka, private archives, used with permission.


Along the Journey - April 21, 1806
The Camp - April 21, 1806:
Washington side of the Columbia River, across from the Deschutes River junction with the Columbia River.



 
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June/July 2004, Lyn Topinka
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