Households


  • If possible, avoid driving as ash is harmful to vehicles, the roads may be slippery and driving suspends ash into the air that causes low visibility and may be harmful or irritating to others.
  • If driving is crucial, drive slowly, use headlights and ample windscreen fluid. Using wipers on dry ash may scratch the windscreen. In heavier ashfall driving should only be undertaken in an emergency. Use water bottles and a cloth to clean the windscreen as required, this may be every few tens of meters.
  • Change oil and oil filters frequently (every 50-100 miles (80-160 km) in heavy dust; every 500-1000 miles (800-1600 km) in light dust).
  • Do not drive without an air filter. If you cannot change it, clean it by blowing air from the inside out. Do not change it until you notice a loss of power to the engine, as a dirty filter is more effective than a clean one.
  • Cleaning your car - clean ash from inside your engine, trunk/boot and spare tire storage area as well as the seating area. Brushing ash off the car can cause scratching.
  • Have a service garage clean wheel brake assemblies every 50-100 miles (80-160 km) for very severe road conditions, or every 200-500 (320-800 km) miles for heavy dust conditions.
  • The brake assemblies should be cleaned with compressed air.
  • Have a service garage clean alternators with compressed air after heavy accumulation, every 500 to 1000 miles (800-1600 km), or after severe dust exposure.
  • Clean the vehicle, including the engine, radiator and other essential parts daily and if necessary, use water to flush the ash.
  • Wash the engine compartment with a garden hose or steam cleaner. Be sure to seal off air intakes and electrical components before cleaning.