Hazard Notification System (HANS) for Volcanoes

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ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Tuesday, September 20, 2022, 12:10 PM AKDT (Tuesday, September 20, 2022, 20:10 UTC)


SEMISOPOCHNOI VOLCANO (VNUM #311060)
51°55'44" N 179°35'52" E, Summit Elevation 2625 ft (800 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Seismicity remains elevated with a few local earthquakes and weak intermittent tremor being observed. No explosions or ash emissions were detected or observed. Typical steaming was seen in web camera images over the past day. 

Small eruptions producing minor ash deposits within the vicinity of the active north crater of Mount Cerberus and ash clouds usually under 10,000 ft (3 km) above sea level have characterized the recent activity. Small explosions and associated ash emissions could resume and may be difficult to detect during periods of high winds and/or when thick cloud cover obscures the volcano. Ash emissions over the past several years of activity have typically reached altitudes of less than 10,000 ft (3 km) above mean sea level. 

Semisopochnoi is monitored by local seismic and infrasound sensors, satellite data, web cameras, and regional infrasound and lightning networks.



GREAT SITKIN VOLCANO (VNUM #311120)
52°4'35" N 176°6'39" W, Summit Elevation 5709 ft (1740 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Low-level eruption of lava likely continues at Great Sitkin. Clouds obscured satellite images over the last day and a temporary data outage is affecting the local seismic network and webcams, but no significant activity was observed on regional geophysical networks.

The terrain is steep near the terminus of the current eruption's lava flows, and blocks of lava could detach without warning and form small rock avalanches in these valleys. These avalanches may liberate ash and gas and could travel several hundred meters beyond the lava flows; they would be hazardous to anyone in those areas.  

Great Sitkin is monitored by local seismic and infrasound sensors, satellite data, web cameras, and regional infrasound and lightning networks.



PAVLOF VOLCANO (VNUM #312030)
55°25'2" N 161°53'37" W, Summit Elevation 8261 ft (2518 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Pavlof Volcano continues to erupt from the vent on the volcano’s east flank just below the summit. Continued seismic tremor was detected in local seismic data, but no explosion were detected. Clear satellite images over the past day showed elevated surface temperatures reflecting continued low-level eruption of lava, but no active lava flows extended down the flanks from the vent. Typical minor steaming was observed in webcam images over the past day.

Small explosions associated with the current eruption could happen at any time and may be accompanied by small ash plumes within the immediate vicinity of the volcano. The level of unrest at Pavlof can change quickly and the progression to more significant eruptive activity can occur with little or no warning.

Pavlof is monitored by local seismic and infrasound sensors, satellite data, web cameras, and regional infrasound and lightning networks.



CLEVELAND VOLCANO (VNUM #311240)
52°49'20" N 169°56'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Unrest continues at Cleveland. Minor and typical steam emissions from the summit crater were observed in a high-resolution satellite image from yesterday afternoon. No other activity observed in satellite data. The two seismic and infrasound stations on Chuginadak Island were temporarily offline yesterday due to maintenance work, but the data flow has resumed. No activity was observed.

Episodes of lava effusion and explosions can occur without advance warning. Explosions from Cleveland are normally short duration and only present a hazard to aviation in the immediate vicinity of the volcano. Larger explosions that present a more widespread hazard to aviation are possible but are less likely and occur less frequently.

When operational, Cleveland volcano is monitored by only two seismic stations, which restricts AVO's ability to precisely locate earthquakes and detect precursory unrest that may lead to an explosive eruption. Rapid detection of an ash-producing eruption may be possible using a combination of seismic, infrasound, lightning, and satellite data.



OTHER ALASKA VOLCANOES

Information on all Alaska volcanoes is available at: http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

For definitions of Aviation Color Codes and Volcano Alert Levels, see: http://www.avo.alaska.edu/color_codes.php

SUBSCRIBE TO VOLCANO ALERT MESSAGES by email: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns/

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CONTACT INFORMATION:

Michelle Coombs, Scientist-in-Charge, USGS, mcoombs@usgs.gov, (907) 786-7497

David Fee, Coordinating Scientist, UAFGI, dfee1@alaska.edu, (907) 378-5460



The Alaska Volcano Observatory is a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys.