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Alert Level: WATCH, Color Code: ORANGE
2018-04-25 18:58:17 UTC





HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Wednesday, April 25, 2018, 8:58 AM HST (Wednesday, April 25, 2018, 18:58 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptions continue at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and East Rift Zone. The summit lava lake overflowed the Overlook crater rim yesterday morning and again last night as summit tiltmeters recorded overall inflationary tilt during the day. A slight deflationary tilt signal began at the summit overnight. Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone continues the inflationary trend of the past several weeks, and the Episode 61g lava flow is active within two kilometers of the vent. The flow does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. There is currently no active lava on the pali, the coastal plain, or entering the ocean.

Summit Observations: Summit tiltmeters recorded a sequence of inflationary-deflationary-inflationary tilt in the past 24 hours with the lava lake spilling over the Overlook crater rim during the inflationary tilt periods. Overnight, a slight deflationary trend began. The lava lake spilled over the southwest crater rim yesterday morning between about 6:30 am and 8:00 a.m. HST and again from 8:30 pm, to 11:06 pm along the south and southwest rims. The height of the lava lake was measured last nigh at 79 meters (259 feet) below the rim of Halema'uma'u crater. The summit area remains in an overall inflated state. Seismicity in the summit area has not changed significantly, with tremor amplitude fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering and a few small earthquakes in the upper East Rift Zone and south part of the caldera. Elevated summit sulfur dioxide emission rates persist. Current webcam views are here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Inflationary tilt continues to be recorded by a tiltmeter at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, continuing the inflationary trend of the past several weeks. Webcam views showed no new flows in the crater in the past 24 hours, but the floor itself is uplifting. The lava pond is also elevated and had an overflow yesterday morning that was contained within the West Pit. Seismicity is at normal, background levels. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from the East Rift Zone vents has been steady over the past several months and remains significantly lower than the summit emission rate.

Lava Flow Observations: There is no lava flow activity from the Episode 61g lava flow on the coastal plain or pali, and no lava is flowing into the ocean. Lava flow activity continues on the upper flow field, above the pali and closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. Areas of the upper flow field with active lava flows are located within the Kahaualeʻa Natural Area Reserve, which has been closed to the public by DLNR since 2007 due to volcanic hazards. Webcam views of the flow field are available here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html. Maps of the lava flow field can be found here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html. For more info about the Kahaualeʻa NAR closure, please visit: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/ecosystems/nars/hawaii-island/kahaualea-2.

Lava Flow Field and Ocean Entry Hazards: The current location of active surface lava is not accessible to hikers and is predominantly in a closed area. Hikers and visitors to the lower Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flow field should be prepared for a variety of hazards, including, but not limited to: hard, rough, uneven, and sharp terrain which can lead to falls, abrasions, lacerations, and other injuries, as well as heat exhaustion or dehydration. Heavy rains can occur with little warning, producing a steamy ground-fog on recent flows that severely limits visibility. This steam can be acidic and should be avoided.

No services are available on the lava flow field and cell reception is limited.

Please consult safety information at these links before heading out and heed all posted signs:
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/
https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

Though inactive at present, the 2016-2017 lava delta remains potentially unstable, and collapse of some or all of the delta without warning is possible. In several instances, collapses have also incorporated parts of the older sea cliff. Explosions of rocky debris remain possible should collapses suddenly expose the hot interior of the inactive lava delta.


MORE INFORMATION

Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Lava viewing information:
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm
County of Hawaii: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-viewing/
Kalapana lava-viewing area: 808-430-1966

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.


HVO/USGS Volcanic Activity Notice

Volcano: Kilauea (VNUM #332010)

Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH

Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Issued: Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 4:28 PM HST
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
Notice Number:
Location: N 19 deg 25 min W 155 deg 17 min
Elevation: 4091 ft (1247 m)
Area: Hawaii

Volcanic Activity Summary: Recent Observations

High lava lake levels in the informally named "Overlook crater" within Halemaʻumaʻu at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano have resulted in a series of overflows of lava onto the Halemaʻumaʻu crater floor beginning late on April 21 and continuing intermittently through this morning. These are the first significant overflows of the summit lava lake since May 2015 (a small overflow also occurred in October 2016). Accompanying this high stand of lava within the Overlook crater are nearly continuous areas of spattering along the margins of the lava lake, providing good views from Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park's Jaggar Museum Overlook. Sulphur dioxide gas emissions from the lake remain elevated.

Recent Observations

Since mid-March 2018, tiltmeters and GPS instruments have recorded an overall trend of inflationary tilt at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano reflecting an increase in the amount of magma in the shallow magmatic reservoir. In response, the lava lake within the Overlook crater has risen, reaching levels high enough for lava to flow over the crater rim and spread to the north, south, and southwest of the vent. A series of overflows, each lasting tens of minutes to several hours, occurred between April 21 and April 24. Between overflows, the lava column receded below the Overlook crater rim before rising again.

Based on HVO web camera records and direct observations, these flows are similar to those produced in the April-May 2015 overflows. They consist of lobate sheets of shelly pāhoehoe traveling as far as 375 m (about a quarter mile) across the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu. As of midday April 23, the new lava flows had covered about 40 acres (about 30 percent) of the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu. Each overflow also adds some height to the enclosing vent rim.

Photos of the overflows can be seen on the HVO web site at: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/kilauea_multimedia_15.html

Beginning in mid-April 2018 and continuing through the current high lava lake level and subsequent overflows, HVO seismometers recorded an uptick in small earthquakes beneath Kīlauea's summit and upper East Rift Zone reflecting increased pressurization. However, unlike the April-May 2015 event, no bursts of earthquakes or deformation indicating an intrusion of magma into the southern caldera region of Kilauea have yet been recorded.

Although Kīlauea's summit and East Rift Zone magma systems are connected, with changes at one sometimes leading to changes at the other, the Puʻu ʻŌʻō vent on Kīlauea Volcano's East Rift Zone has shown no direct response to the recent overflows. However, HVO tiltmeters, GPS, web cameras, and field observations, continue to record inflation of Puʻu ʻŌʻō and the upper portion of the Episode 61g lava tube system, which could lead to the opening of a new vent on or near Pu'u 'Ō'ō. If/when that happens, it is possible, even likely, that the summit lava lake will be affected, most likely by a significant drop in the lake level.

Hazard Analysis

High levels of sulfur dioxide gas, rockfalls, and explosions remain the primary hazards of concern. While the lake level is high, the risk of rockfalls and subsequent explosion of molten spatter and rock debris onto the southeast rim of Halemaʻumaʻu is slightly elevated due to the shorter vertical distance from the lake surface to the crater rim. These rockfalls and explosions can occur suddenly and without warning, underscoring the extremely hazardous nature of the Halema'uma'u rim, an area that has been closed to the public since late 2007.

Visitors to the Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park Jaggar Museum Overlook and other Park areas should also note that under southerly (non-trade) wind conditions, rockfalls and explosions can result in a dusting of powdery to gritty ash composed of volcanic glass and rock fragments. These ashfalls represent a minor hazard, but visitors should be aware that dustings of ash at Jaggar Museum and other areas around the Kīlauea summit are possible.

For more information on gas hazards at the summit of Kīlauea, please see: https://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/fs20173017

For more information about volcanic ash hazards and precautions at Kīlauea, please see: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/hazards/FAQ_SO2-Vog-Ash/main.html


Remarks: The current high level of lava within the Overlook crater within Halemaʻumaʻu is best explained by an increase in the amount of magma stored within Kīlauea Volcano's shallow magma system, something that has occurred many times during the ongoing East Rift Zone eruption. This increase is also responsible for the continuing inflation and elevated microearthquake activity in the summit region.

However, the exact cause of increased magma within the shallow storage system at Kīlauea's summit is not known. Possible causes include (1) increased magma supply from deeper sources within the volcano, (2) a constriction or blockage in the conduit that carries magma from the summit storage system to the East Rift Zone, or (3) some combination of both.

During similar lava lake activity at Halemaʻumaʻu in the 1800s and early 1900s, lava lakes like the current one frequently produced overflows. With time, overflows and intermittent lava spattering can build a collar or levee of solidified lava that contains the rising and circulating lava lake. This phenomenon is known as a "perched lava lake."

As long as Kīlauea's summit magma reservoir remains pressurized and the current inflationary trend continues, we expect high lava lake levels, occasional overflows on the Halemaʻumaʻu floor, and possibly formation of a perched lava lake. Rockfalls into the summit lava lake accompanied by explosions and ejection of molten spatter and rock debris may occur and gas emissions will continue to be elevated. Ongoing spattering from sources on the surface of the lake will continue to produce fine ash and Pele's hair that can be blown far downwind.

HVO is closely monitoring Kīlauea Volcano, especially watching for any signs of unrest that could precede a new outbreak of lava or a change in behavior at either the Puʻu ʻŌʻō or summit Overlook crater vents.


Contacts: askHVO@usgs.gov

Next Notice: Daily updates on all volcanic activity at Kīlauea are issued each morning and posted on out website: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

You can sign up to receive these messages automatically by visiting https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 9:06 AM HST (Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 19:06 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptions continue at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and East Rift Zone. The summit lava lake overflowed the Overlook crater rim yesterday morning and again earlier this morning as summit tiltmeters recorded overall inflationary tilt. Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone continues the inflationary trend of the past several weeks, and the Episode 61g lava flow is active above Pulama pali. The flow does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. There is currently no active lava on the pali, the coastal plain, or entering the ocean.

Summit Observations: Summit tiltmeters recorded a sequence of deflationary and inflationary tilt in the past 24 hours with the lava lake spilling over the Overlook crater rim during the inflationary tilt periods. An overflight yesterday afternoon showed that the overflows covered about 30 percent of the Halemaumau crater foor, approximately 16 ha (40 acres). The lava lake spilled over the south crater rim earlier this morning between about 6:30 am and 8:00 a.m. HST. The summit area remains in an overall inflated state. Seismicity in the summit area has not changed significantly, with tremor amplitude fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering and a few small earthquakes in the upper East Rift Zone and south part of the caldera. Elevated summit sulfur dioxide emission rates persist. Current webcam views are here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Inflationary tilt continues to be recorded by a tiltmeter at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, continuing the inflationary trend of the past several weeks. Webcam views showed no new flows in the crater in the past 24 hours. An overflight yesterday afternoon showed evidence of continued uplift of the crater floor, including significant cracks on the northeast part of the crater. Seismicity is at normal, background levels. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from the East Rift Zone vents has been steady over the past several months and remains significantly lower than the summit emission rate.

Lava Flow Observations: There is no lava flow activity from the Episode 61g lava flow on the coastal plain or pali, and no lava is flowing into the ocean. Lava flow activity continues on the upper flow field, above the pali and closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. Areas of the upper flow field with active lava flows are located within the Kahaualeʻa Natural Area Reserve, which has been closed to the public by DLNR since 2007 due to volcanic hazards. Webcam views of the flow field are available here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html. Maps of the lava flow field can be found here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html. For more info about the Kahaualeʻa NAR closure, please visit: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/ecosystems/nars/hawaii-island/kahaualea-2.

Lava Flow Field and Ocean Entry Hazards: The current location of active surface lava is not accessible to hikers and is predominantly in a closed area. Hikers and visitors to the lower Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flow field should be prepared for a variety of hazards, including, but not limited to: hard, rough, uneven and sharp terrain, which can lead to falls, abrasions, lacerations, and other injuries, as well as heat exhaustion or dehydration. Heavy rains can occur with little warning, producing a steamy ground-fog on recent flows that severely limits visibility. This steam can be acidic and should be avoided.

No services are available on the lava flow field and cell reception is limited.

Please consult safety information at these links before heading out and heed all posted signs:
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/
https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

Though inactive at present, the 2016-2017 lava delta remains potentially unstable, and collapse of some or all of the delta without warning is possible. In several instances, collapses have also incorporated parts of the older sea cliff. Explosions of rocky debris remain possible should collapses suddenly expose the hot interior of the inactive lava delta.


MORE INFORMATION

Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Lava viewing information:
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm
County of Hawaii: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-viewing/
Kalapana lava-viewing area: 808-430-1966

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Monday, April 23, 2018, 9:11 AM HST (Monday, April 23, 2018, 19:11 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptions continue at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and East Rift Zone. The summit lava lake overflowed the Overlook crater rim several times in the past day as summit tiltmeters continued to record an overall inflationary tilt. Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone continues the inflationary trend of the past several weeks, and the Episode 61g lava flow is active above Pulama pali. The flow does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. There is currently no active lava on the pali, the coastal plain, or entering the ocean.

Summit Observations: Summit tiltmeters continued to record an overall inflationary tilt and the lava lake spilled over the Overlook crater rim several times in the past day, including at the time of this update. Seismicity in the summit area has not changed significantly, with tremor amplitude fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering and a few more small earthquakes in the upper East Rift Zone and south part of the caldera. Elevated summit sulfur dioxide emission rates persist. Current webcam views are here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Inflationary tilt continues to be recorded by a tiltmeter at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, continuing the inflationary trend of the past several weeks. Webcam views showed no new flows in the crater in the past 24 hours. Seismicity is at normal, background levels. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from the East Rift Zone vents has been steady over the past several months and remains significantly lower than the summit emission rate.

Lava Flow Observations: There is no lava flow activity from the Episode 61g lava flow on the coastal plain or pali, and no lava is flowing into the ocean. Lava flow activity continues on the upper flow field, above the pali and closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. Areas of the upper flow field with active lava flows are located within the Kahaualeʻa Natural Area Reserve, which has been closed to the public by DLNR since 2007 due to volcanic hazards. Webcam views of the flow field are available here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html. Maps of the lava flow field can be found here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html. For more info about the Kahaualeʻa NAR closure, please visit: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/ecosystems/nars/hawaii-island/kahaualea-2.

Lava Flow Field and Ocean Entry Hazards: The current location of active surface lava is not accessible to hikers and is predominantly in a closed area. Hikers and visitors to the lower Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flow field should be prepared for a variety of hazards, including, but not limited to: hard, rough, uneven and sharp terrain, which can lead to falls, abrasions, lacerations, and other injuries, as well as heat exhaustion or dehydration. Heavy rains can occur with little warning, producing a steamy ground-fog on recent flows that severely limits visibility. This steam can be acidic and should be avoided.

No services are available on the lava flow field and cell reception is limited.

Please consult safety information at these links before heading out and heed all posted signs:
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/
https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

Though inactive at present, the 2016-2017 lava delta remains potentially unstable, and collapse of some or all of the delta without warning is possible. In several instances, collapses have also incorporated parts of the older sea cliff. Explosions of rocky debris remain possible should collapses suddenly expose the hot interior of the inactive lava delta.


MORE INFORMATION

Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Lava viewing information:
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm
County of Hawaii: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-viewing/
Kalapana lava-viewing area: 808-430-1966

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Sunday, April 22, 2018, 8:59 AM HST (Sunday, April 22, 2018, 18:59 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptions continue at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and East Rift Zone. The summit lava lake level continued to rise over the past day, with one small overflow of the south crater rim about midnight. The summit inflationary tilt began to slow yesterday afternoon, nearly leveling off this morning. Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone continues the inflationary trend of the past several weeks, and the Episode 61g lava flow is active above Pulama pali. The flow does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. There is currently no active lava on the pali, the coastal plain, or entering the ocean.

Summit Observations: The inflationary tilt recorded by summit tiltmeters in the past couple of days slowed yesterday afternoon and has nearly leveled off this monring. When measured yesterday afternoon, the lava lake level was about 6 m (20 ft) below the rim of Overlook crater, a rise of about 4 m (13 ft) from the day before. Webcam images show that a small overflow along the south crater rim occurred about midnight. The lava lake is is below the rim this morning. Seismicity in the summit area is within normal, background rates, with tremor amplitude fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering and a few more small earthquakes in the upper East Rift Zone and south part of the caldera. Elevated summit sulfur dioxide emission rates persist. Current webcam views are here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Inflationary tilt continues to be recorded by a tiltmeter at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, continuing the inflationary trend of the past several weeks. Webcam views showed no new flows in the crater in the past 24 hours. Seismicity is at normal, background levels. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from the East Rift Zone vents has been steady over the past several months and remains significantly lower than the summit emission rate.

Lava Flow Observations: There is no lava flow activity from the Episode 61g lava flow on the coastal plain or pali, and no lava is flowing into the ocean. Lava flow activity continues on the upper flow field, above the pali and closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. Areas of the upper flow field with active lava flows are located within the Kahaualeʻa Natural Area Reserve, which has been closed to the public by DLNR since 2007 due to volcanic hazards. Webcam views of the flow field are available here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html. Maps of the lava flow field can be found here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html. For more info about the Kahaualeʻa NAR closure, please visit: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/ecosystems/nars/hawaii-island/kahaualea-2.

Lava Flow Field and Ocean Entry Hazards: The current location of active surface lava is not accessible to hikers and is predominantly in a closed area. Hikers and visitors to the lower Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flow field should be prepared for a variety of hazards, including, but not limited to: hard, rough, uneven and sharp terrain, which can lead to falls, abrasions, lacerations, and other injuries, as well as heat exhaustion or dehydration. Heavy rains can occur with little warning, producing a steamy ground-fog on recent flows that severely limits visibility. This steam can be acidic and should be avoided.

No services are available on the lava flow field and cell reception is limited.

Please consult safety information at these links before heading out and heed all posted signs:
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/
https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

Though inactive at present, the 2016-2017 lava delta remains potentially unstable, and collapse of some or all of the delta without warning is possible. In several instances, collapses have also incorporated parts of the older sea cliff. Explosions of rocky debris remain possible should collapses suddenly expose the hot interior of the inactive lava delta.


MORE INFORMATION

Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Lava viewing information:
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm
County of Hawaii: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-viewing/
Kalapana lava-viewing area: 808-430-1966

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Saturday, April 21, 2018, 8:38 AM HST (Saturday, April 21, 2018, 18:38 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptions continue at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and East Rift Zone. The summit lava lake level rose slightly overnight as summit tiltmeters continued to record inflationary tilt. Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone continues the inflationary trend of the past several weeks, and the Episode 61g lava flow is active above Pulama pali. The flow does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. There is currently no active lava on the pali, the coastal plain, or entering the ocean.

Summit Observations: Summit tiltmeters recorded inflationary tilt during the past day. When measured yesterday afternoon, the lava lake level was about 10 m (33 ft) below the rim of Overlook crater; the level had risen 4 meters (13 ft) from the previous day. The lava lake continued to rise overnight by a few meters (yards). Seismicity in the summit area is within normal, background rates, with tremor amplitude fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering and a few more small earthquakes in the upper East Rift Zone. Elevated summit sulfur dioxide emission rates persist. Current webcam views are here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Inflationary tilt continues to be recorded by a tiltmeter at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, continuing the inflationary trend of the past several weeks. Webcam views showed no new flows in the crater in the past 24 hours. Seismicity is at normal, background levels. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from the East Rift Zone vents has been steady over the past several months and remains significantly lower than the summit emission rate.

Lava Flow Observations: There is no lava flow activity from the Episode 61g lava flow on the coastal plain or pali, and no lava is flowing into the ocean. Lava flow activity continues on the upper flow field, above the pali and closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. Areas of the upper flow field with active lava flows are located within the Kahaualeʻa Natural Area Reserve, which has been closed to the public by DLNR since 2007 due to volcanic hazards. Webcam views of the flow field are available here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html. Maps of the lava flow field can be found here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html. For more info about the Kahaualeʻa NAR closure, please visit: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/ecosystems/nars/hawaii-island/kahaualea-2.

Lava Flow Field and Ocean Entry Hazards: The current location of active surface lava is not accessible to hikers and is predominantly in a closed area. Hikers and visitors to the lower Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flow field should be prepared for a variety of hazards, including, but not limited to: hard, rough, uneven and sharp terrain, which can lead to falls, abrasions, lacerations, and other injuries, as well as heat exhaustion or dehydration. Heavy rains can occur with little warning, producing a steamy ground-fog on recent flows that severely limits visibility. This steam can be acidic and should be avoided.

No services are available on the lava flow field and cell reception is limited.

Please consult safety information at these links before heading out and heed all posted signs:
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/
https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

Though inactive at present, the 2016-2017 lava delta remains potentially unstable, and collapse of some or all of the delta without warning is possible. In several instances, collapses have also incorporated parts of the older sea cliff. Explosions of rocky debris remain possible should collapses suddenly expose the hot interior of the inactive lava delta.


MORE INFORMATION

Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Lava viewing information:
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm
County of Hawaii: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-viewing/
Kalapana lava-viewing area: 808-430-1966

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Friday, April 20, 2018, 9:05 AM HST (Friday, April 20, 2018, 19:05 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptions continue at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and East Rift Zone. The summit lava lake level rose slightly overnight as summit tiltmeters continued to record inflationary tilt. Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone continues the inflationary trend of the past several weeks, and the Episode 61g lava flow is active above Pulama pali. The flow does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. There is currently no active lava on the pali, the coastal plain, or entering the ocean.

Summit Observations: Summit tiltmeters recorded inflationary tilt during the past day. When measured yesterday afternoon, the lava lake level was about 14 m (46 ft) below the rim of Overlook crater; the level had risen 11 meters (36 ft) from the previous day. The lava lake continued to rise overnight by a few meters (yards). Seismicity in the summit area is within normal, background rates, with tremor amplitude fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering. Elevated summit sulfur dioxide emission rates persist. Current webcam views are here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Inflationary tilt continues to be recorded by a tiltmeter at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, continuing the inflationary trend of the past several weeks. Good weather On Tuesday morning allowed geologists to observe changes at the west pit lava pond—overflows of the pond have built it several meters (yards) above the west pit floor. The pond level was 7 m (23 ft) higher than it was in late March. This is consistent with the overall inflationary trend and uplift of the main crater floor at Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Webcam views showed no new flows in the crater in the past 24 hours. Seismicity is at normal, background levels. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from the East Rift Zone vents has been steady over the past several months and remains significantly lower than the summit emission rate.

Lava Flow Observations: There is no lava flow activity from the Episode 61g lava flow on the coastal plain or pali, and no lava is flowing into the ocean. Lava flow activity continues on the upper flow field, above the pali and closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. Areas of the upper flow field with active lava flows are located within the Kahaualeʻa Natural Area Reserve, which has been closed to the public by DLNR since 2007 due to volcanic hazards. Webcam views of the flow field are available here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html. Maps of the lava flow field can be found here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html. For more info about the Kahaualeʻa NAR closure, please visit: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/ecosystems/nars/hawaii-island/kahaualea-2.

Lava Flow Field and Ocean Entry Hazards: The current location of active surface lava is not accessible to hikers and is predominantly in a closed area. Hikers and visitors to the lower Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flow field should be prepared for a variety of hazards, including, but not limited to: hard, rough, uneven and sharp terrain, which can lead to falls, abrasions, lacerations, and other injuries, as well as heat exhaustion or dehydration. Heavy rains can occur with little warning, producing a steamy ground-fog on recent flows that severely limits visibility. This steam can be acidic and should be avoided.

No services are available on the lava flow field and cell reception is limited.

Please consult safety information at these links before heading out and heed all posted signs:
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/
https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

Though inactive at present, the 2016-2017 lava delta remains potentially unstable, and collapse of some or all of the delta without warning is possible. In several instances, collapses have also incorporated parts of the older sea cliff. Explosions of rocky debris remain possible should collapses suddenly expose the hot interior of the inactive lava delta.


MORE INFORMATION

Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Lava viewing information:
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm
County of Hawaii: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-viewing/
Kalapana lava-viewing area: 808-430-1966

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Thursday, April 19, 2018, 9:34 AM HST (Thursday, April 19, 2018, 19:34 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptions continue at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and East Rift Zone. The summit lava lake level rose slightly overnight as summit tiltmeters recorded a reversal from deflationary tilt to inflationary tilt. Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone continues the inflationary trend of the past several weeks, and the Episode 61g lava flow is active above Pulama pali. The flow does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. There is currently no active lava on the pali, the coastal plain, or entering the ocean.

Summit Observations: Summit tiltmeters recorded very little change in tilt most of yesterday, but they have recorded inflationary tilt since late last night. When measured early last night, the lava lake level was about 25 m (82 ft) below the rim of Overlook crater; the level has risen several meters (yards) overnight and is visible from Jaggar Museum this morning. Seismicity in the summit area is within normal, background rates, with tremor amplitude fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering. Elevated summit sulfur dioxide emission rates persist. Current webcam views are here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Inflationary tilt continues to be recorded by a tiltmeter at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, continuing the inflationary trend of the past several weeks. Good weather yesterday morning allowed geologists to observe changes at the west pit lava pond—overflows of the pond have built it several meters (yards) above the west pit floor. The pond level is now 7 m (23 ft) higher than it was in late March. This is consistent with the overall inflationary trend and uplift of the main crater floor at Puʻu ʻŌʻō. Webcam views showed no new flows in the crater in the past 24 hours. Seismicity is at normal, background levels. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from the East Rift Zone vents has been steady over the past several months and remains significantly lower than the summit emission rate.

Lava Flow Observations: There is no lava flow activity from the Episode 61g lava flow on the coastal plain or pali, and no lava is flowing into the ocean. Lava flow activity continues on the upper flow field, above the pali and closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. Areas of the upper flow field with active lava flows are located within the Kahaualeʻa Natural Area Reserve, which has been closed to the public by DLNR since 2007 due to volcanic hazards. Webcam views of the flow field are available here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html. Maps of the lava flow field can be found here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html. For more info about the Kahaualeʻa NAR closure, please visit: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/ecosystems/nars/hawaii-island/kahaualea-2.

Lava Flow Field and Ocean Entry Hazards: The current location of active surface lava is not accessible to hikers and is predominantly in a closed area. Hikers and visitors to the lower Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flow field should be prepared for a variety of hazards, including, but not limited to: hard, rough, uneven and sharp terrain, which can lead to falls, abrasions, lacerations, and other injuries, as well as heat exhaustion or dehydration. Heavy rains can occur with little warning, producing a steamy ground-fog on recent flows that severely limits visibility. This steam can be acidic and should be avoided.

No services are available on the lava flow field and cell reception is limited.

Please consult safety information at these links before heading out and heed all posted signs:
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/
https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

Though inactive at present, the 2016-2017 lava delta remains potentially unstable, and collapse of some or all of the delta without warning is possible. In several instances, collapses have also incorporated parts of the older sea cliff. Explosions of rocky debris remain possible should collapses suddenly expose the hot interior of the inactive lava delta.


MORE INFORMATION

Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Lava viewing information:
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm
County of Hawaii: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-viewing/
Kalapana lava-viewing area: 808-430-1966

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 9:18 AM HST (Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 19:18 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptions continue at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and East Rift Zone. The summit lava lake level dropped about 7 m (23 ft) in the past day, corresponding to summit deflation that began yesterday morning. Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone continues the inflationary trend of the past several weeks, and the Episode 61g lava flow is active above Pulama pali. The flow does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. There is currently no active lava on the pali, the coastal plain, or entering the ocean.

Summit Observations: Summit tiltmeters recorded deflationary tilt over the past 24 hours, leveling off earlier this morning. The summit lava lake level is about 20 m (66 ft) below the rim of the Overlook crater, a drop of about 7 m (23 ft) since yesterday morning. Lava spattering is barely visible from the Jaggar Museum at this time. Seismicity in the summit area is within normal, background rates, with tremor amplitude fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering. Elevated summit sulfur dioxide emission rates persist. Current webcam views are here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Inflationary tilt continues to be recorded by a tiltmeter at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, continuing the inflationary trend of the past several weeks. Webcam views showed no new flows in the crater in the past 24 hours. Seismicity is at normal, background levels. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from the East Rift Zone vents has been steady over the past several months and remains significantly lower than the summit emission rate.

Lava Flow Observations: There is no lava flow activity from the Episode 61g lava flow on the coastal plain or pali, and no lava is flowing into the ocean. Lava flow activity continues on the upper flow field, above the pali and closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. Areas of the upper flow field with active lava flows are located within the Kahaualeʻa Natural Area Reserve, which has been closed to the public by DLNR since 2007 due to volcanic hazards. Webcam views of the flow field are available here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html. Maps of the lava flow field can be found here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html. For more info about the Kahaualeʻa NAR closure, please visit: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/ecosystems/nars/hawaii-island/kahaualea-2.

Lava Flow Field and Ocean Entry Hazards: The current location of active surface lava is not accessible to hikers and is predominantly in a closed area. Hikers and visitors to the lower Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flow field should be prepared for a variety of hazards, including, but not limited to: hard, rough, uneven and sharp terrain, which can lead to falls, abrasions, lacerations, and other injuries, as well as heat exhaustion or dehydration. Heavy rains can occur with little warning, producing a steamy ground-fog on recent flows that severely limits visibility. This steam can be acidic and should be avoided.

No services are available on the lava flow field and cell reception is limited.

Please consult safety information at these links before heading out and heed all posted signs:
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/
https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

Though inactive at present, the 2016-2017 lava delta remains potentially unstable, and collapse of some or all of the delta without warning is possible. In several instances, collapses have also incorporated parts of the older sea cliff. Explosions of rocky debris remain possible should collapses suddenly expose the hot interior of the inactive lava delta.


MORE INFORMATION

Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Lava viewing information:
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm
County of Hawaii: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-viewing/
Kalapana lava-viewing area: 808-430-1966

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.


HVO/USGS Volcanic Activity Notice

Volcano: Kilauea (VNUM #332010)

Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH

Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Issued: Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 1:10 PM HST
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
Notice Number:
Location: N 19 deg 25 min W 155 deg 17 min
Elevation: 4091 ft (1247 m)
Area: Hawaii

Volcanic Activity Summary: Observations and measurements of the Pu'u 'Ō'ō eruption on Kīlauea Volcano's East Rift Zone during the past month suggest that the magma system beneath Pu'u 'Ō'ō has become increasingly pressurized. If this activity continues, a new vent could form at any time, either on the Pu'u 'Ō'ō cone or along adjacent areas of the East Rift Zone.

Recent Observations

The Pu'u 'Ō'ō eruption continues to supply lava to the 61g flow and the lava pond within the Pu'u 'Ō'ō crater. As of April 13, 2018, geologists observed scattered breakouts from the 61g flow within about 2.2 km (1.4 miles) from Pu'u 'Ō'ō and a sluggish breakout about 5 km (3.1 miles) from Pu'u 'Ō'ō. During the past few weeks, lava flows have also erupted onto the Pu'u 'Ō'ō crater floor.

Since mid-March 2018, a tiltmeter and GPS station on Pu'u 'Ō'ō have recorded a pronounced inflationary trend of the cone, and recent webcam images have detected simultaneous uplift of the Pu'u 'Ō'ō crater floor by several meters (yards). These observations provide evidence that magma is accumulating at shallow depths beneath Pu'u 'Ō'ō.

Similar episodes of inflation and uplift of the crater floor at Pu'u 'Ō'ō occurred in May–June 2014 and May 2016. These episodes preceded the opening of new vents on Pu'u 'Ō'ō that produced the June 27th flow (active 2014-2016) and the 61g flow (active since 2016), respectively.

Breakouts from the 61g lava flow are located close to Pu'u 'Ō'ō and above the Pulama pali within the Kahaualeʻa Natural Area Reserve (NAR) and Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, respectively. Because of volcanic hazards, the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources has restricted public access to the Kahauale'a NAR since 2007 (https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/ecosystems/nars/hawaii-island/kahaualea-2/). Areas within the National Park are also closed (see https://www.nps.gov/havo/closed_areas.htm for more info on these closures).

Hazard Analysis

A new vent located on the cone of Pu'u 'Ō'ō would erupt lava flows onto one or more sides of the cone that would initially advance downslope rapidly within a few kilometers (miles) from the vent. Because of the potential for a sudden breakout anywhere on Pu'u 'Ō'ō, the cone is extremely hazardous. The location of a new vent or potential lava-flow paths cannot be estimated until such time that a new vent forms and stabilizes.


Remarks: Kīlauea Volcano's East Rift Zone eruption began in January 1983 with high lava fountains that built a cinder-and-spatter cone, later named Pu'u 'Ō'ō. Subsequent activity included continuous lava effusion from vents on Pu'u 'Ō'ō or within a few kilometers (miles) east or west of Pu'u 'Ō'ō. Most of the lava flows erupted from these vents have advanced down the south flank of Kīlauea, often reaching the ocean.

A new vent that opened on the northeast flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō on June 27, 2014, sent a lava flow (informally called the June 27th flow) 20 km (12.4 miles) to the northeast and into Pāhoa, a town in the Puna District of the Island of Hawai'i. This lava flow persisted until early March 2015, when all activity near Pāhoa ceased.

On May 24, 2016, the opening of a new vent on the east flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō led to the demise of the June 27th vent and flow, and sent a new lava flow (61g flow) south-southeast toward the ocean. The flow advanced about 10 km (6.2 miles), reaching the ocean on July 26, 2016. Lava stopped flowing into the ocean in early November 2017, after which surface flows have progressively retreated to near-vent areas above the Pulama pali.

Contacts: askHVO@usgs.gov

Next Notice: Daily updates on all volcanic activity at Kīlauea are issued each morning and posted on out website: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

You can sign up to receive these messages automatically by visiting https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 8:40 AM HST (Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 18:40 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptions continue at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and East Rift Zone. The summit lava lake remains at a high level, with spattering visible from Jaggar Museum. Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone has been inflating and recently produced lava flows on the crater floor. The Episode 61g lava flow is active above Pulama pali and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. There is currently no active lava on the pali, the coastal plain, or entering the ocean. Low rates of ground deformation and seismicity continue across the volcano.

Summit Observations: The summit lava lake remains at a high level, with spattering visible throughout the day from HVO and Jaggar Museum. Yesterday evening, the lava lake level was measured to be about 11 meters (36 ft.) below the rim of the Overlook crater. Summit tiltmeters continued to record inflationary tilt over the past day, leveling off somewhat this morning. Seismicity in the summit area is within normal, background rates, with tremor amplitude fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering. Elevated summit sulfur dioxide emission rates persist. Current webcam views are here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: Minor amounts of inflationary tilt were recorded over the past day by Puʻu ʻŌʻō tiltmeters, continuing the inflationary trend of the past several weeks. Webcam views showed no new flows in the crater in the past 24 hours. Seismicity is at normal, background levels. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from the East Rift Zone vents has been steady over the past several months and remains significantly lower than the summit emission rate.

Lava Flow Observations: There is no lava flow activity from the Episode 61g lava flow on the coastal plain or pali, and no lava is flowing into the ocean. Lava flow activity continues on the upper flow field, above the pali and closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. Areas of the upper flow field with active lava flows are located within the Kahaualeʻa Natural Area Reserve, which has been closed to the public by DLNR since 2007 due to volcanic hazards. Webcam views of the flow field are available here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html. Maps of the lava flow field can be found here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html. For more info about the Kahaualeʻa NAR closure, please visit: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/ecosystems/nars/hawaii-island/kahaualea-2.

Lava Flow Field and Ocean Entry Hazards: The current location of active surface lava is not accessible to hikers and is predominantly in a closed area. Hikers and visitors to the lower Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flow field should be prepared for a variety of hazards, including, but not limited to: hard, rough, uneven and sharp terrain, which can lead to falls, abrasions, lacerations, and other injuries, as well as heat exhaustion or dehydration. Heavy rains can occur with little warning, producing a steamy ground-fog on recent flows that severely limits visibility. This steam can be acidic and should be avoided.

No services are available on the lava flow field and cell reception is limited.

Please consult safety information at these links before heading out and heed all posted signs:
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/
https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

Though inactive at present, the 2016-2017 lava delta remains potentially unstable, and collapse of some or all of the delta without warning is possible. In several instances, collapses have also incorporated parts of the older sea cliff. Explosions of rocky debris remain possible should collapses suddenly expose the hot interior of the inactive lava delta.


MORE INFORMATION

Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Lava viewing information:
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm
County of Hawaii: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-viewing/
Kalapana lava-viewing area: 808-430-1966

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Monday, April 16, 2018, 9:05 AM HST (Monday, April 16, 2018, 19:05 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Activity Summary: Eruptions at Kīlauea Volcano's summit and East Rift Zone continue. The summit lava lake remains at a high level, with spattering visible from Jaggar Museum. Puʻu ʻŌʻō cone has been inflating and recently produced lava flows on the crater floor. The Episode 61g lava flow is active above Pulama pali and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. There is currently no active lava on the pali, the coastal plain, or entering the ocean. Low rates of ground deformation and seismicity continue across the volcano.

Summit Observations: The summit lava lake continues to rise and remains at a high level, with spattering visible yesterday from HVO and Jaggar Museum. This morning it was measured to be about 10 meters (33 ft.) below the rim of the Overlook crater. Summit tiltmeters continued to record inflationary tilt throughout the day. Seismicity in the summit area is within normal, background rates, with tremor amplitude fluctuations associated with lava lake spattering. A slight increase in seismicity in the Upper East Rift Zone began overnight. The largest event was a M2.9 earthquake. Elevated summit sulfur dioxide emission rates persist. Current webcam views are here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Puʻu ʻŌʻō Observations: No significant change in tilt was recorded on Puʻu ʻŌʻō tiltmeters over the past day and seismicity is at normal, background levels. The overall trend over the past several weeks has been one of inflationary tilt. Webcam views showed no new flows in the crater in the past 24 hours. The sulfur dioxide emission rate from the East Rift Zone vents has been steady over the past several months and remains significantly lower than the summit emission rate.

Lava Flow Observations: There is no lava flow activity from the Episode 61g lava flow on the coastal plain or pali, and no lava is flowing into the ocean. Lava flow activity continues on the upper flow field, above the pali and closer to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and does not pose a threat to nearby communities at this time. Areas of the upper flow field with active lava flows are located within the Kahaualeʻa Natural Area Reserve, which has been closed to the public by DLNR since 2007 due to volcanic hazards. Webcam views of the flow field are available here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html. Maps of the lava flow field can be found here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html For more info about the Kahaualeʻa NAR closure, please visit: https://dlnr.hawaii.gov/ecosystems/nars/hawaii-island/kahaualea-2.

Lava Flow Field and Ocean Entry Hazards: The current location of active surface lava is not accessible to hikers and is predominantly in a closed area. Hikers and visitors to the lower Puʻu ʻŌʻō lava flow field should be prepared for a variety of hazards, including, but not limited to: hard, rough, uneven and sharp terrain, which can lead to falls, abrasions, lacerations, and other injuries, as well as heat exhaustion or dehydration. Heavy rains can occur with little warning, producing a steamy ground-fog on recent flows that severely limits visibility. This steam can be acidic and should be avoided.

No services are available on the lava flow field and cell reception is limited.

Please consult safety information at these links before heading out and heed all posted signs:
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2000/fs152-00/
https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm

Though inactive at present, the 2016-2017 lava delta remains potentially unstable, and collapse of some or all of the delta without warning is possible. In several instances, collapses have also incorporated parts of the older sea cliff. Explosions of rocky debris remain possible should collapses suddenly expose the hot interior of the inactive lava delta.


MORE INFORMATION

Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862

Lava viewing information:
Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park: https://www.nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/lava2.htm
County of Hawaii: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-viewing/
Kalapana lava-viewing area: 808-430-1966

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/Video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_chronology.html

Lava Flow Maps: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

Definitions of terms used in update: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/definitions.pdf

Overview of Kīlauea summit (Halemaʻumaʻu) and East Rift Zone (Puʻu ʻŌʻō ) eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/background.pdf

Summary of volcanic hazards from Kīlauea eruptions:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/extra/hazards.pdf

Recent Earthquakes in Hawai'i (map and list):
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/alertsystem/index.php
https://pubs.usgs.gov/fs/2006/3139/

HVO Contact: askHVO@usgs.gov

CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.