Link to USGS home page.
USGS HOME
Contact USGS

Facebook Icon Twitter Icon
  • Assess
  • Prepare
  • Forecast
  • |
  • Activity
  • Products
  • Observatories
  • About


Alert Level: NORMAL, Color Code: GREEN
2020-05-07 01:32:10 UTC





HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY MONTHLY UPDATE
U.S. Geological Survey
Wednesday, May 6, 2020, 3:32 PM HST (Thursday, May 7, 2020, 01:32 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN

Activity Summary: Kīlauea Volcano is not erupting. Monitoring data for the month of April show variable but typical rates of seismicity and ground deformation, low rates of sulfur dioxide emissions, and only minor geologic changes since the end of eruptive activity in September 2018.

Observations: Monitoring data have shown no significant changes in volcanic activity in April.

Rates of seismicity over the month were about 25 per cent lower than during the past month. Sulfur dioxide emission rates are low at the summit and are below detection limits at Puʻu ʻŌʻō and the lower East Rift Zone. The crater lake at the bottom of Halema'uma'u continues to slowly expand and deepen. As of May 3rd, the lake depth was approximately 35 meters or 115 feet.

Over the past month, the summit tiltmeter recorded 4 deflation-inflation events--down from 10 recorded last month. In April 2020, deformation rates at Kilauea's summit and middle East Rift Zone continue to show inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas measurements show continuing low levels of sulfur dioxide emission from the Halema'uma'u area, consistent with no significant shallowing of magma. Some amount of sulfur dioxide is being dissolved into the summit lake and work continues to try and quantify this process. The lake was last sampled by UAS in January and additional sampling with UAS is planned.

Farther east, GPS stations and tiltmeters continue to show motions consistent with slowed refilling of the deep East Rift Zone magmatic reservoir in the broad region between Puʻu ʻŌʻō and Highway 130. The decrease in deformation rates at tilt station POO, observed in February, continued through April. GPS station JOKA, and tilt station JKA, in the lower East Rift Zone, experienced another episode of deformation through April with a different direction from the longer term trend. Monitoring data do not suggest any imminent change in volcanic hazard for this area. The south flank of Kīlauea continued to creep seaward at elevated rates following the May 4, 2018 M6.9 earthquake near Kalapana. HVO continues to carefully monitor all data streams along the Kīlauea East Rift Zone and south flank for important changes.

Although not currently erupting, areas of persistently elevated ground temperatures and minor release of gases are still found in the vicinity of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone fissures. These include steam (water), very small amounts of hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide. These conditions are expected to be long-term. Similar conditions following the 1955 eruption continued for years to decades.

Hazards: Hazards remain in the lower East Rift Zone eruption area and at the Kīlauea summit. Residents and visitors near the 2018 fissures, lava flows, and summit collapse area should heed Hawaii County Civil Defense and National Park warnings. Lava flows and features created by the 2018 eruption are primarily on private property and persons are asked to be respectful and not enter or park on private property.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) continues to closely monitor geologic changes, seismicity, deformation, and gas emissions for any sign of increased activity at Kīlauea. HVO maintains visual surveillance of the volcano with web cameras and field visits. Additional messages and alert level changes will be issued as warranted by changing activity.

Background Since June 25 2019, Kīlauea Volcano has been at NORMAL/GREEN. For definitions of USGS Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes, see: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/about_alerts.html. Kīlauea remains an active volcano, and it will erupt again. Although we expect clear signs prior to the next eruption, the time frame of warning may be short. Island of Hawaiʻi residents should be familiar with the long-term hazard map for Kīlauea Volcano (https://pubs.usgs.gov/mf/1992/2193/) and should stay informed about Kīlauea activity.



This notice contains additional volcanoes not displayed: Hualalai (NORMAL/GREEN), Mauna Kea (NORMAL/GREEN), Haleakala (NORMAL/GREEN), Loihi Seamount (UNASSIGNED/UNASSIGNED).

MORE INFORMATION:

Activity summary for Mauna Loa is also available by phone: (808) 967-8866

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/multimedia_chronology.html

FAQs of Mauna Loa: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/faq_maunaloa.html

Summary of volcanic hazards from eruptions: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/hawaii_hazards.html

Recent earthquakes in Hawaiʻi (map and list): https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/about_alerts.html


CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawaiʻi.



HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY INFORMATION STATEMENT
U.S. Geological Survey
Wednesday, April 8, 2020, 9:41 AM HST (Wednesday, April 8, 2020, 19:41 UTC)


KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN

KĪLAUEA INFORMATION STATEMENT

SUMMARY

Since August 2019, the US Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) has recorded over 5,900 earthquakes beneath Kīlauea's lower Southwest Rift Zone in a cluster about 6 mi (10 km) wide near the town of Pāhala. These earthquakes are occurring 15-25 mi (25-40 km) below the surface.

Deep earthquakes of this type do not generally pose a hazard from ground-shaking. Most earthquakes in the sequence have been magnitude-2 or lower, and most have not been felt by residents.

Clustering of deep earthquakes in this region does not mean an eruption is imminent. HVO has recorded earthquakes in this area for many decades across several eruptive cycles at both Kīlauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes. No correlation between seismic activity in this zone and volcanic activity at the surface has been established, although this is an important topic for future research.

BACKGROUND

Past studies suggest these earthquakes, and associated episodes of rhythmic ground shaking known as tremor, are the result of stresses caused by transport of magma through the Earth's mantle deep beneath the island, an area that may be the source region supplying magma to the active volcanoes.

The HVO monitoring network has recorded a high rate of seismicity in this region, typically between 20-40 earthquakes per day, since August 2019. A peak rate of more than 80 per day was recorded in February 2020. These rates are the highest ever measured for the area in the 60 years of instrumental observation. A sustained increase of this deep seismicity above long term background levels began as early as November 2015, although at rates lower than currently observed.

The strongest earthquake recorded in this sequence since August 2019 was a magnitude-3.5 event on January 6, 2020. The largest ever recorded by HVO in this deep region was a magnitude-4.7 earthquake in January 2006. Earthquakes in the magnitude 3-4 range can be felt widely by residents and are reported as weak to light shaking.

HVO continues to monitor the volcanoes of Hawaii including daily analysis of ongoing Pāhala area seismicity. We will provide additional updates on any significant change in volcano status.

For more information on deep earthquakes in the Pāhala area, please see the Volcano Watch article titled, "Why do so many deep earthquakes happen around Pāhala?" published by HVO scientists on October 10, 2019: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/hvo_volcano_watch.html?vwid=1433


HVO Contact Information: askHVO@usgs.gov

MORE INFORMATION:

Activity summary for Mauna Loa is also available by phone: (808) 967-8866

Subscribe to these messages: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Webcam images: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/multimedia_webcams.html

Photos/video: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/multimedia_chronology.html

FAQs of Mauna Loa: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/faq_maunaloa.html

Summary of volcanic hazards from eruptions: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/hawaii_hazards.html

Recent earthquakes in Hawaiʻi (map and list): https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html

Explanation of Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vhp/about_alerts.html


CONTACT INFORMATION:

askHVO@usgs.gov

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawaiʻi.