Link to USGS home page.
USGS HOME
Contact USGS

  • Assess
  • Prepare
  • Forecast
  • |
  • Activity
  • Products
  • Observatories
  • About

Photo & Video Chronology


USGS-HVO photos and videos are in the public domain and can be freely downloaded from the HVO website (click on a photo to open a full resolution copy). Please credit "U.S. Geological Survey" for any imagery used.

September 11, 2018
Kīlauea summit

The Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) team completed its mission at Kīlauea Volcano's summit, mapping changes within the caldera. Since August 4, 2018, the number of earthquakes at the summit have decreased and the rate of subsidence has stabilized. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit is less than 200 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. Limited UAS flights into this hazardous area are conducted with permission and coordination with Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Scientists examine the UAS data in detail to understand how the collapse area is evolving and to assess hazards at Kīlauea's summit, all of which is shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers.
September 10, 2018
Kīlauea Middle East Rift Zone

On September 8, a series of small collapses occurred within the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater throughout the day, with each producing a visible brown plume. The largest, shown in this webcam image, occurred at about 10:30 a.m. HST. The collapses generated small tilt offsets and seismic energy recorded by nearby geophysical instruments, but had no discernible effect on other parts of the rift zone.
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

On September 4-7, the Unmanned Aircraft Systems team flew several missions documenting changes within fissure 8 on Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone. On September 4, lava erupted on the crater floor within the vent, building a small cone on the floor and creating a flow that did not extend beyond the vent walls. On September 5, gas bursts briefly lifted the crust over a small opening on the lava flow surface. On September 6, minor incandescence was visible overnight, but only fuming was observed during daylight hours. On September 7, activity was limited to fuming and slight deflation of the lava flow surface near the center of fissure 8.
September 6, 2018
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

Incandescence from fissure 8 was noted a couple of times overnight, but no spattering or glow was visible during the Unmanned Aircraft Systems overflight around 8:00 a.m. this morning, as shown here. Lava within the fissure 8 crater looked much the same as yesterday, except that the new cone appeared less prominent. Steam in background is due to recent rainfall.
September 5, 2018
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

An Unmanned Aircraft Systems overflight yesterday (September 4, 2018) showed a small cone on the floor of the crater within fissure 8. The cone formed as lava erupted from an opening on the surface of the flow that covers the crater floor.

A closer view of the small cone forming on the floor of crater within fissure 8 today (Sept. 5). By this morning, bits of molten lava emitted from the cone every few seconds had built it up to an estimated height of around 3-4 m (about 10-13 ft).
September 4, 2018
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

Hovering at about 180 m (600 ft), the Unmanned Aircraft Systems captured this view into the fissure 8 cinder cone. Lava has filled the small footprint-shaped crater inside the cone. Sluggish Pāhoehoe flows have crept across the crater floor, but are not flowing down the spillway. Other lower East Rift Zone vents were steaming due to morning rainfall.
September 3, 2018
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

Left: Early this morning, the Unmanned Aircraft Systems team was able to conduct a brief overflight of fissure 8 between passing rain showers, which resulted in abundant steaming on the flow field. This UAS image shows a small pond of lava on the floor of the crater within the fissure 8 cone, with some minor, low-level spattering and slow-moving lava just barely entering (but not heading down) the spillway. Nothing unusual was observed anywhere else on the lower East Rift Zone. Right: Another UAS image captured early this morning looks directly down into the fissure 8 cone. The new lava is lighter in color compared to the older, darker lava farther down the spillway (left).

During an overflight of fissure 8 this morning, HVO geologists observed low-level spattering on the new pad of lava within the cone. Slow-moving lava had just barely entered the spillway, but was not advancing down the channel.
September 2, 2018
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

Left: An Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) overflight on early Sunday afternoon (Sept. 2, 2018) showed that lava remained active within the fissure 8 cone. HVO geologists and UAS crews were on site and closely monitoring the lower East Rift Zone, including the fissure 8 activity. Right: This UAS oblique image of fissure 8 shows that the new lava is mostly confined to the crater floor within the cone, although a small amount extended a short distance into the spillway. By early evening, HVO geologists noted that the lava activity was at a low level, with only minimal (if any) incandescence emanating from the cone. Gas emissions from the vent were nearly nonexistent.
September 1, 2018
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

An Unmanned Aircraft Systems overflight of fissure 8 on Saturday afternoon (Sept. 1, 2018) showed incandescence within the cinder cone, with reports that lava had covered the 65x15 m (210x45 ft) crater floor by evening. Webcam views overnight showed weak incandescence occasionally reflected on the eastern spillway wall from the crater, suggesting that the lava in the crater remained active.
August 31, 2018
Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone

A sand bar, comprised of black sand and lava fragments carried by longshore currents from the lava delta, continues to block the boat ramp at Isaac Hale Beach Park.
August 30, 2018
Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone

Lower East Rift Zone lava flows entering the ocean have built a lava delta over 875 acres in size, but no active ocean entries were observed by HVO geologists on this morning's overflight. View to the southwest.

The fissure 8 lava channel (center) and levee (foreground), looking toward the northwest. Loose rubble and Pele's hair (lower right) are strewn across the levee surface.
Kīlauea Volcano's summit

The Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) team circumnavigates the crater rim at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, collecting data for digital elevation models that document summit changes. The volume change, from early May 2018 to present, is over 825 million cubic meters (1 billion cubic yards). The vertical collapse of the crater floor is more than 500 m (1600 ft). Limited UAS flights into this hazardous area are conducted with permission and coordination with Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Scientists examine the UAS data in detail to understand how the collapse area is evolving and to assess hazards at Kīlauea's summit, all of which is shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers.