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Photo & Video Chronology


USGS-HVO photos and videos are in the public domain and can be freely downloaded from the HVO website (click on a photo to open a full resolution copy). Please credit "U.S. Geological Survey" for any imagery used.

October 21, 2018
Great Hawaii ShakeOut

On October 18 at 10:18 a.m. HST, scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory practiced "Drop, Cover, Hold on!"—the best actions to take during an earthquake to prevent injuries—during the Great Hawaii ShakeOut. Since 1868, more than 30 magnitude-6.0 or greater earthquakes have rattled the Hawaiian Islands—most recently on May 4, 2018 (M6.9)—so it's important for Hawaii residents to know (and practice) what to do when the ground shakes. The Great Hawaii ShakeOut is an annual earthquake awareness and preparedness event held on the third Thursday of October. For more info on earthquake safety, please visit https://www.shakeout.org/hawaii/.
October 15, 2018
Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea as seen from Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone

Low sulfur dioxide gas emissions on Kīlauea have resulted in greatly diminished vog (volcanic air pollution) in Hawaii, giving rise to spectacular views on the island. Here, looking across the field of lava erupted from Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone this past summer, the shield-shaped profiles of Mauna Loa (left) and Mauna Kea (right) can be clearly seen in the far distance.
October 4, 2018
No significant changes at Fissure 8 or Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō

This wide-angle photo shows the fissure 8 cone (center of image) and the long line of steaming areas extending uprift (west), towards the upper right corner of the image. No significant change was observed at fissure 8 during today's overflight. Thermal images (see inset lower left) show no signs of lava within the cone - the small collapse pit in the center of the crater floor is cold.

Left: A thick plume obscured views into Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō's crater with the naked eye today, but thermal images were able to see into the deep parts of the crater. The bottom of the crater appears to still be covered in collapse rubble - there were no signs of any hot material. Right: A large black sand beach remains at Pohoiki. The sand continues to block access to the boat ramp, which is just to the right of the center of the photo. The thick fissure 8 lava flows can be seen in the lower left portion of the image.
September 28, 2018
Before and after satellite images of Leilani Estates subdivision

This comparison shows satellite images of Leilani Estates subdivision before and after. The image on the right, collected in early September 2018, shows that the eastern portion of the subdivision has been covered by lava. The fissure 8 lava channel runs northeast from the fissure 8 cone at the start of the channel. Note also the brown areas of dead vegetation south of the lava flow. Highway 130 runs north-south along the left side of the images.
Before and after satellite images of the Fissure 8 area in Leilani Estates

A close up comparison of the fissure 8 area in Leilani Estates subdivision. Leilani Avenue runs right-left (east-west) through the center of the images. On the right side, the crater within the fissure 8 cone is visible. The fissure 8 lava channel extends north from the cone. For a map of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption fissures and surrounding area, see the HVO web site: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html
Before and after satellite images of Lanipuna Gardens subdivision

This comparison shows before and after images in the area of Lanipuna Gardens subdivision. Pohoiki Road runs left to right through the center of the image. The Puna Geothermal Ventures site is in the upper left portion of the image. For a map of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption fissures and surrounding area, see the HVO web site: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html
Before and after satellite images of Kapoho

This comparison shows the area of Kapoho before and after. Kapoho Crater is in the left portion of the image. Lava filled much of the crater, including the small nested crater that contained Green Lake. The Kapoho Beach Lots subdivision is in the right side of the image, north of Kapoho Bay, and was completely covered by the fissure 8 lava flow. Vacationland Hawai‘i, in the lower right corner of the image, was also completely covered, along with the adjacent tide pools. Kapoho Farm Lots, near the center of the image, is also beneath the flow. For a map of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption fissures and surrounding area, see the HVO web site: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html
September 11, 2018
Kīlauea summit

The Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) team completed its mission at Kīlauea Volcano's summit, mapping changes within the caldera. Since August 4, 2018, the number of earthquakes at the summit have decreased and the rate of subsidence has stabilized. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates at the summit is less than 200 tonnes/day, which is lower than at any time since late 2007. Limited UAS flights into this hazardous area are conducted with permission and coordination with Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Scientists examine the UAS data in detail to understand how the collapse area is evolving and to assess hazards at Kīlauea's summit, all of which is shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers.
September 10, 2018
Kīlauea Middle East Rift Zone

On September 8, a series of small collapses occurred within the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater throughout the day, with each producing a visible brown plume. The largest, shown in this webcam image, occurred at about 10:30 a.m. HST. The collapses generated small tilt offsets and seismic energy recorded by nearby geophysical instruments, but had no discernible effect on other parts of the rift zone.
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

On September 4-7, the Unmanned Aircraft Systems team flew several missions documenting changes within fissure 8 on Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone. On September 4, lava erupted on the crater floor within the vent, building a small cone on the floor and creating a flow that did not extend beyond the vent walls. On September 5, gas bursts briefly lifted the crust over a small opening on the lava flow surface. On September 6, minor incandescence was visible overnight, but only fuming was observed during daylight hours. On September 7, activity was limited to fuming and slight deflation of the lava flow surface near the center of fissure 8.
September 6, 2018
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

Incandescence from fissure 8 was noted a couple of times overnight, but no spattering or glow was visible during the Unmanned Aircraft Systems overflight around 8:00 a.m. this morning, as shown here. Lava within the fissure 8 crater looked much the same as yesterday, except that the new cone appeared less prominent. Steam in background is due to recent rainfall.
September 5, 2018
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

An Unmanned Aircraft Systems overflight yesterday (September 4, 2018) showed a small cone on the floor of the crater within fissure 8. The cone formed as lava erupted from an opening on the surface of the flow that covers the crater floor.

A closer view of the small cone forming on the floor of crater within fissure 8 today (Sept. 5). By this morning, bits of molten lava emitted from the cone every few seconds had built it up to an estimated height of around 3-4 m (about 10-13 ft).
September 4, 2018
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

Hovering at about 180 m (600 ft), the Unmanned Aircraft Systems captured this view into the fissure 8 cinder cone. Lava has filled the small footprint-shaped crater inside the cone. Sluggish Pāhoehoe flows have crept across the crater floor, but are not flowing down the spillway. Other lower East Rift Zone vents were steaming due to morning rainfall.
September 3, 2018
Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone

Left: Early this morning, the Unmanned Aircraft Systems team was able to conduct a brief overflight of fissure 8 between passing rain showers, which resulted in abundant steaming on the flow field. This UAS image shows a small pond of lava on the floor of the crater within the fissure 8 cone, with some minor, low-level spattering and slow-moving lava just barely entering (but not heading down) the spillway. Nothing unusual was observed anywhere else on the lower East Rift Zone. Right: Another UAS image captured early this morning looks directly down into the fissure 8 cone. The new lava is lighter in color compared to the older, darker lava farther down the spillway (left).

During an overflight of fissure 8 this morning, HVO geologists observed low-level spattering on the new pad of lava within the cone. Slow-moving lava had just barely entered the spillway, but was not advancing down the channel.