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U.S. Volcanoes and Current Activity Alerts

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News

New field guides provide insight into western volcanic regions.

In preparation for the August 2017 IAVCEI international scientific assembly in Portland, Oregon, researchers have been working on field guides that interpret the dynamic volcanic landscapes of North American Cordillera, which is home to a greater diversity of volcanic provinces than any comparably sized region in the world.

Volcanic Unrest is Persistent in Alaska and Hawaii

The Alaska Volcano Observatory website includes complete information about volcanoes in Alaska.
  • Mount Cleveland, located in the central Aleutian Islands, has been in a state of volcanic unrest since June 17, 2015. Explosive eruptions can send ash to altitudes hazardous to aviation.
  • Bogoslof volcano, located in the central Aleutian Islands, is in a state of elevated unrest since eruptions began December 12, 2016. Eruptive activity is dominated by explosions that can put volcanic ash to altitudes exceeding 30,000 feet, resulting in ash cloud hazards to aviation.
  • Pavlof Volcano, located on the Alaska Peninsula, is in a heightened state of unrest and an unpredictable condition.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory website offers information about volcanoes in Hawaii.
  • Kīlauea Volcano on the Island of Hawai‘i has been erupting from its East Rift Zone nearly continuously since 1983. Lava flowing into the Pacific Ocean presentsocean entry hazards to visitors. A second eruption began at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008 where an active lava lake produces occasional explosions and gas emissions that create Statewide vog hazards.
  • Mauna Loa Volcano on the Island of Hawai‘i began showing signs of unrest in 2014, and the volcano alert level and aviation color code were raised on September 17, 2015. Elevated rates of earthquakes and ground deformation persist and HVO continues to monitor the volcano closely.


  • Summit of Cleveland Volcano in Alaska's central Aleutian Islands. A lava dome is visible in the crater.
    Summit of Cleveland Volcano in Alaska's central Aleutian Islands. A lava dome is visible in the crater.
    Summit of Cleveland Volcano in Alaska's central Aleutian Islands. A lava dome is visible in the crater.
  • Worldview-2 satellite image of Bogoslof volcano collected on March 11, 2017 at 22:15 UTC (1:15 PM AKST). Image data provided under Digital Globe NextView License.
    Worldview-2 satellite image of Bogoslof volcano collected on March 11, 2017 at 22:15 UTC (1:15 PM AKST). Image data provided under Digital Globe NextView License.
    Worldview-2 satellite image of Bogoslof volcano collected on March 11, 2017 at 22:15 UTC (1:15 PM AKST). Image data provided under Digital Globe NextView License.
  • Worldview satellite image collected at 14:34 AKDT (22:34 UTC) on May 28, 2017 showing the initial development of the eruption cloud from Bogoslof volcano.
    Worldview satellite image collected at 14:34 AKDT (22:34 UTC) on May 28, 2017 showing the initial development of the eruption cloud from Bogoslof volcano.
    Worldview satellite image collected at 14:34 AKDT (22:34 UTC) on May 28, 2017 showing the initial development of the eruption cloud from Bogoslof volcano.
  • A wide view of the ocean entry, showing the broad lava delta on the right. Lava deltas (new land formed at the ocean entry) are built on a foundation of rubble, so they can (and do) collapse without warning. Because of this, lava deltas are one of the most hazardous areas on KILAUEA, and people are urged to enjoy the beauty of the ocean entry from a safe distance.
    A wide view of the ocean entry, showing the broad lava delta on the right. Lava deltas (new land formed at the ocean entry) are built on a foundation of rubble, so they can (and do) collapse without warning. Because of this, lava deltas are one of the most hazardous areas on KILAUEA, and people are urged to enjoy the beauty of the ocean entry from a safe distance.
    A wide view of the ocean entry, showing the broad lava delta on the right. Lava deltas (new land formed at the ocean entry) are built on a foundation of rubble, so they can (and do) collapse without w
  • A closer look at KILAUEA's summit lava lake on Wednesday evening, around 6:30 p.m., when the lake was just 8 meters (26 feet) below the floor of HALEMAUMAU Crater.
    A closer look at KILAUEA's summit lava lake on Wednesday evening, around 6:30 p.m., when the lake was just 8 meters (26 feet) below the floor of HALEMAUMAU Crater.
    A closer look at Kīlauea's summit lava lake on Wednesday evening, around 6:30 p.m., when the lake was just 8 meters (26 feet) below the floor of Halema‘uma‘u Crater.
  • Steaming Pavlof volcano and Pavlof Sister as viewed from the west shore of Unga Island, Alaska. View is to the west.
    Steaming Pavlof volcano and Pavlof Sister as viewed from the west shore of Unga Island, Alaska. View is to the west.
    Steaming Pavlof volcano and Pavlof Sister as viewed from the west shore of Unga Island, Alaska. View is to the west.