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U.S. Volcanoes and Current Activity Alerts

Activity Alerts:
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  • Mammoth Hot Springs at Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.
    Mammoth Hot Springs at Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.
    Mammoth Hot Springs at Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.
  • View of new fissure from Luana Street near fissure 2 and 7, Leilani Estates
    View of new fissure from Luana Street near fissure 2 and 7, Leilani Estates
    View of new fissure from Luana Street near fissure 2 and 7, Leilani Estates
  •  View of the ash plume from Halemauamu from the Mauna Loa web cam at 5:10 a.m. HST. At about 04:15 a.m. HST,  an explosion from the Overlook vent within Halemaumau crater at Kilauea Volcano's summit produced a volcanic cloud that reached as high as 30,000 ft. and drifted northeast. This activity has produced a substantial ash fall at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and a minor ash fall in the Vol
     View of the ash plume from Halemauamu from the Mauna Loa web cam at 5:10 a.m. HST. At about 04:15 a.m. HST,  an explosion from the Overlook vent within Halemaumau crater at Kilauea Volcano's summit produced a volcanic cloud that reached as high as 30,000 ft. and drifted northeast. This activity has produced a substantial ash fall at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and a minor ash fall in the Vol
    View of the ash plume from Halemauamu from the Mauna Loa web cam at 5:10 a.m. HST. At about 04:15 a.m. HST, an explosion from the Overlook vent within Halemaumau crater at Kīlauea Volcano's summit p
  • Fissure 8 reactivated on the afternoon of May 28 and at times, was fountaining to heights of 200 feet and feeding a lava flow traveling to the northeast.
    Fissure 8 reactivated on the afternoon of May 28 and at times, was fountaining to heights of 200 feet and feeding a lava flow traveling to the northeast.
    Fissure 8 reactivated on the afternoon of May 28 and at times, was fountaining to heights of 200 feet and feeding a lava flow traveling to the northeast.
  • Steamboat Geyser in the steam-phase of an eruption on June 4, 2018, Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.
    Steamboat Geyser in the steam-phase of an eruption on June 4, 2018, Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.
    Steamboat Geyser in the steam-phase of an eruption on June 4, 2018, Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park.
  • Aerial view into HALEMAUMAU. Explosions and collapse have enlarged the crater that previously hosted the lava lake. Parking area for Overlook (closed since 2008) seen to left.
    Aerial view into HALEMAUMAU. Explosions and collapse have enlarged the crater that previously hosted the lava lake. Parking area for Overlook (closed since 2008) seen to left.
    Aerial view into Halema‘uma‘u. Explosions and collapse have enlarged the crater that previously hosted the lava lake. Parking area for Overlook (closed since 2008) seen to left.
  • As of the morning of June 5, the fissure 8 lava flow front had completely filled Kapoho Bay.
    As of the morning of June 5, the fissure 8 lava flow front had completely filled Kapoho Bay.
    As of the morning of June 5, the fissure 8 lava flow front had completely filled Kapoho Bay.

Read Our Two Weekly Volcano Observatory Science Articles

Scientists within the USGS Volcano Hazards Program operate from within five U.S. volcano observatories. One of the primary goals of the observatories is to be an authoritative source for enlightening information about our Nation's volcanoes.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of the five, has a long history of writing regular articles about volcanic activity and scientific research on the Hawaiian volcanoes. HVO's weekly article, "Volcano Watch," entered its 27th year of publication in November 2017. The entire catalog of articles can be accessed and searched on their website. New articles are published every Thursday afternoon.

Taking lead from HVO, the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), the newest of the five observatories, began a weekly article on the first day of 2018. This new column—the "Yellowstone¬†Caldera Chronicles"—is posted each Monday on the homepage of YVO's website . Like HVO's Volcano Watch series, the YVO Chronicles are peer-reviewed and edited before publication.

If you are interested in learning more about a specific topic related to Yellowstone or Hawaiian volcanism, please contact us. We will certainly answer, and you may see a longer-winded answer in a future Volcano Watch or Yellowstone Caldera Chronicle article.



Volcanic Unrest is Persistent in Alaska and Hawaii

The Alaska Volcano Observatory website (AVO) includes complete information about volcanoes in Alaska.
  • Mount Cleveland, located in the central Aleutian Islands, has been in a state of volcanic unrest since June 17, 2015. Explosive eruptions can send ash to altitudes hazardous to aviation.
  • Great Sitkin, located in the central Aleutian Islands, has been in a state of volcanic unrest since July 1, 2018. Explosive eruptions can send ash to altitudes hazardous to aviation.
  • Mount Veniaminof, located on the Alaskan Peninsula, has been in a state of volcanic unrest since September 3, 2018. Seismicity is above background levels and low-level ash emissions have been observed.
The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory website offers information about volcanoes in Hawaii.
  • Kīlauea Volcano on the Island of Hawai‘i has been erupting from its East Rift Zone nearly continuously since 1983. A small amount of lava remains in the fissure 8 vent on Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone.