NVEWS: National Volcano Early Warning System

map of world showing icons for U.S. volcanoes by threat level

U.S. Volcanoes and NVEWS Targets: red – 35 highest
priority volcanoes, orange – 22 high-priority volcanoes,
small green – the other U.S. volcanoes.

The National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS) is a proposed national-scale plan to ensure that volcanoes are monitored at levels commensurate to their threats. The plan was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) and its affiliated partners in the Consortium of U.S. Volcano Observatories (CUSVO) (http://www.cusvo.org).

Roughly half of the Nation's 169 young volcanoes are dangerous because of the manner in which they erupt and the communities within their reach. Currently, many of these volcanoes have insufficient monitoring systems (for example, seismometers and continuous GPS [Global Positioning System]), and others have outdated equipment. The NVEWS plan ensures that the most hazardous volcanoes would be properly monitored well in advance of the onset of activity, making it possible for scientists to improve the timeliness and accuracy of hazard forecasts and for citizens to take proper and timely action to reduce risk.

In addition, the NVEWS plan seeks to improve a number of capabilities of the US volcanology community through the following elements: 1) Increased partnerships with local governments and emergency responders, 2) grants to universities and other groups for cooperative research to advance volcano science, monitoring technologies, and mitigation strategies, 3) added staffing and automation to improve 24/7 monitoring of volcanoes, and 4) computer systems to distribute data to scientists, responding agencies, and the public, and to unify the systems currently used to monitor US volcanoes.

More information can be found in the documents listed below.

Top Priority Volcanoes for Improved Monitoring Networks

The overall result of the 2005 NVEWS assessment was the identification of 57 priority volcanoes undermonitored for the threats posed and thus targets for improved monitoring networks. Priority targets in this table may have changed since the 2005 assessment as incremental monitoring improvements have been made.

Region Highest Priority High Priority
Alaska Akutan, Amak, Amukta, Augustine, Bogoslof, Cleveland, Fourpeaked, Kasatochi, Kiska, Makushin, Recheshnoi, Redoubt, Seguam, Vsevidof, Yantarni, Yunaska Black Peak, Chiginagak, Churchill, Dana, Douglas, Dutton, Edgecumbe, Hayes, Kaguyak, Kupreanof, Spurr, Wrangell
Washington Glacier Peak, Mount Baker, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens Mount Adams
Oregon Crater Lake, Mount Hood, Newberry, Three Sisters
California Lassen Volcanic Center, Mount Shasta Clear Lake, Mono-Inyo Craters, Mono Lake Volcanic Field, Medicine Lake
Wyoming Yellowstone
Hawaii Kilauea, Mauna Loa Hualalai
Commonwealth of N. Mariana Islands Agrigan, Alamagan, Anatahan, Asuncion, Farallon de Pajaros, Guguan, Pagan Sarigan

NVEWS Documents and Other Supporting Information