April 16 - 17, 1806
Leaving the Gorge - Rock Fort and The Dalles
 
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The Volcanoes of Lewis and Clark

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Mount Adams, Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, Mount Rainier, and Mount St. Helens

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October 1805 to June 1806

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Pacific Northwest Maps - Columbia River, Volcanoes, Flood Basalts, Missoula Floods, Geology, etc.

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April 15
Columbia River Gorge, Major Creek to The Dalles
April 16-17

Leaving the Gorge,
Rock Fort and The Dalles

Rock Fort, Mount Hood, The Submerged Forest, The Dalles (Oregon)
CONTINUE

April 18-20
Up the Columbia, The Dalles and the "Long Narrows"
 

On October 7, 1805, Lewis and Clark and the "Corps of Discovery" began their journey down the Clearwater River and into the volcanics of the Pacific Northwest. The Corps travelled from the Clearwater to the Snake and down the "Great Columbia", finally reaching the Pacific Ocean on November 15, 1805. Along the journey they encountered the lava flows of the Columbia Plateau, river channels carved by the great "Missoula Floods", and the awesome beauty of five Cascade Range volcanoes.

Map, Lewis and Clark in the Pacific Northwest, click for brief
                         summary
[Click map for brief summary about the area]


 
Heading for Home - April 1806
Leaving the Gorge - Rock Fort and The Dalles
 

Lewis and Clark's "main" camp from April 15 through April 17 was at "Rock Fort", near Mill Creek, The Dalles, Oregon.

Wednesday, April 16, 1806
In the morning, Captain Clarke crossed with nine men [to the Washington side], and a large part of the merchandise, in order to purchase twelve horses to transport our baggage, and some pounded fish, as a reserve during the passage of the Rocky mountains. The rest of the men were employed in hunting and preparing saddles [at Rock Fort, The Dalles, Oregon].


Along the Journey - April 16, 1806
Rock Fort, 2004

Rock Fort:
The fort-like basalt outcropping lies just downstream from the mouth of Mill Creek at present-day The Dalles, Oregon, on a wedge-shaped parcel bordered by the Columbia River, Bargeway Road, and Bridge and Garrison Streets. A riverfront trail leads to Rock Fort where interpretive signage marks the campsite. -- U.S. National Park Service Website, Lewis and Clark Expedition, 2003


Map, 1858 Military recon map, The Dalles and Mill Creek, click to enlarge Map, 1985, Mill Creek, The Dalles, click to enlarge Image, 2004, Rock Fort
  1. 1858 Military Recon Map (section of original), Columbia River and The Dalles Vicinity. (Click to enlarge). Map of military reconnaissance from Fort Dalles, Oregon, via Fort Wallah-Wallah, to Fort Taylor, Washington Territory, 1858. Shows approximate location of military road constructed 1859 to 1862. From the report and maps of Captain John Mullan, United States Army, G.P.O., 1863. University of Washington Archives #UW85. -- University of Washington Library Archives Website, 2004
  2. 1985 Map, Mill Creek and The Dalles. (Click to enlarge). Office of Coast Surveys, Historical Maps and Charts, Columbia River, Bonneville to The Dalles, 1985, Chart#18531, 1:40,000. -- NOAA Office of Coast Survey Website, 2004
  3. 2004, Rock Fort, The Dalles, Oregon. (Click to enlarge). Copyright © 2004 Lyn Topinka, private archives, used with permission.


From the rapids [Bonneville/Cascade Locks] to this place [Rock Fort, The Dalles, Oregon], and indeed as far as the commencement of the narrows, the Columbia is from half a mile to three quarters in width, and possesses scarcely any current: its bed consists principally of rock, except at the entrance of Labiche river [Hood River], which takes its rise in mount Hood, from which, like Quicksand river [Sandy River], it brings down vast quantities of sand.


Along the Journey - April 16, 1806
Mount Hood and The Dalles, Oregon, from Dallesport, Washington, 2004

Mount Hood and The Dalles, Oregon:
Mount Hood, at 11,245 feet high, is the fourth highest peak in the Cascade Range and the highest in the state of Oregon. The peak dominates the skyline from the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area to the wheat fields of Wasco and Sherman Counties of eastern Oregon.


Map, the Volcanoes of Lewis and Clark, click to enlarge Map, 1993, Mount Hood and Vicinity, click to enlarge Map, 1814, Lewis and Clark on the Columbia, click to enlarge Map, 1853, Washington and Oregon and the Columbia River, click to enlarge Map, 1855, Columbia River, Vancouver to the Pacific, click to enlarge Map, 1860, Columbia River, Washington, Oregon, click to enlarge Engraving, 1853, The Dalles, Oregon, with Mount Hood, click to enlarge Image, 1867, The Dalles, Oregon, and Mount Hood, from Rockland, Washington, click to enlarge Engraving detail, 1884, The Dalles and Mount Hood, with Mill Creek, click to enlarge Penny Postcard, ca.1915, Mount Hood from The Dalles, click to enlarge Image, 2004, Mount Hood from Rock Fort Image, 2004, Mount Hood and The Dalles, Oregon
  1. Map, "Lewis and Clark Volcano Sitings"
  2. 1993 Map, Mount Hood and Vicinity, showing river drainages which flow into the Columbia river. (Click to enlarge). Includes Hood River and the Sandy River. Map modified from: Brantley and Scott, 1993.
  3. 1814 Map, Lewis and Clark's map of the Columbia River (section of original). (Click to enlarge.) Map includes three of the five volcanoes Lewis and Clark saw and commented on. While the journals mention the expedition seeing Mount Adams, it does not appear on their map. Mount Jefferson is just visible to the south (bottom) and Mount Rainier is to the north but off the map. From the "Nicholas Biddle/Paul Allen" 1814 publication. Original Map: "A Map of Lewis and Clark's Track, Across the Western Portion of North America, From the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean". From: History of the expedition under the command of Captains Lewis and Clark : to the sources of the Missouri, thence across the Rocky Mountains and down the river Columbia to the Pacific Ocean : performed during the years 1804-5-6 : by order of the government of the United States / prepared for the press by Paul Allen. Philadelphia : Bradford and Insskeep, 1814. Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University #upbover maps37. -- Brigham Young University, Harold B. Lee Library Website, 2004.
  4. 1853 Map, Washington and Oregon and the Columbia River, from the Clearwater River to the Snake River and down the Columbia River to the Pacific Ocean (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Includes: Clearwater River (Kooskooski), Lapwai Creek (Lapwai R.), Snake River (Saptin or Lewis R.), Columbia River (Columbia R.), Yakima River (Yakima R.), Walla Walla River (Wallawalla R.), Umatilla River (Umatilla R.), Willow Creek (Quesnells R.), John Day River (John day's R.), Deschutes River (Fall R.), Willamette River (Willammette R.), and Cowlitz River (Cowlitz R.). Original Map: "Map of California, Oregon, Washington, Utah, and New Mexico (1853)", by Thomas Cowperthwait & Co. Washington State University Archives #WSU22. -- Washington State University Library Collections Website, 2003
  5. 1855 Map, Columbia River from Vancouver to the Pacific, including Mount St. Helens (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Original Map: "Map of Oregon and Washington Territories: showing the proposed Northern Railroad route to the Pacific Ocean, by John Disturnell, 1855. University of Washington Archives #UW155. -- University of Washington Library Collections Website, 2002
  6. 1860 Map, Columbia River, Washington State, and Oregon (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Original Map: Map of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia, (1860). This map dates between March 2nd, 1861 (when the Dakota Territory was formed) and March 4th, 1863 (when the Idaho Territory was formed from eastern Washington and western Dakota) Nearing retirement from a thirty year long and rather successful career, S. Augustus Mitchell printed this map showcasing Oregon, the Territory of Washington, and British Columbia. Washington became a territory in 1853, arguing that distances to Willamette Valley kept them from obtaining a voice in the Oregon territorial government. As this map shows, when it split from Oregon proper the Washington territory included parts of Wyoming and Montana and all of Idaho. Territorial government for Idaho would not be approved until 1863. When Mitchell retired he left the business for his son to manage. Washington State University Archives #WSU7. -- Washington State University Archives, 2004
  7. 1853 Engraving, Columbia River area indian camp at The Dalles, Oregon, with Mount Hood in the background. (Click to enlarge). Engraving by John M. Stanley, 1853. From the U.S. War Department's Reports of explorations and surveys to ascertain the most practicable and econmical route for a railroad from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean, 1860, v.12, pt.1, pl.43. University of Washington Libraries Collection, #NA4170. -- University of Washington Libraries Website, 2002
  8. 1867, The Dalles, Oregon, and Mount Hood. (Click to enlarge). View from Rockland, Washington (today's Dallesport). Photographer: Carleton Watkins. Oregon Historical Society #21577, #1100-A, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center Catalogue #2001.06.003. -- Columbia Gorge Discovery Center Website, 2004
  9. 1884, Closer-in detail from engraving of The Dalles, Oregon, and Mount Hood. (Click to enlarge). Created by H. Wellge. Published 1884, J.J. Stoner, Madison, Wisconsin. Panoramic view of the city of The Dalles, Oregon, county seat of Wasco County, 1884. Original lithograph shows The Dalles, Mount Hood, the Columbia River, and the mouth of Mill Creek. Reference #LC Panoramic Maps #727. -- Library of Congress American Memories Website, 2002
  10. ca.1915, Penny Postcard, Mount Hood from near The Dalles. (Click to enlarge). "Mount Hood as seen from bank of the Columbia River near The Dalles, Ore.", A.M. Prentiss Photo. #447, Lipschuetz of Katz, Portland, Oregon. -- L.Topinka private collection, 2003, used with permission.
  11. 2004, Mount Hood, Oregon, as seen from Rock Fort, The Dalles, Oregon. (Click to enlarge). Copyright © 2004 Lyn Topinka, private archives, used with permission.
  12. 2004, Mount Hood and The Dalles, Oregon, as seen from Dallesport, Washington. (Click to enlarge). Copyright © 2004 Lyn Topinka, private archives, used with permission.


During the whole course of the Columbia from the Rapids [Bonneville/Cascade Locks area] to the Chilluckittequaws [White Salmon area] are the trunks of many large pine trees standing erect in water, [Submerged Forest] which is thirty feet deep at present, and never less than ten. These trees could never have grown in their present state, for they are all very much doated, and none of them vegetate; so that the only reasonable account which can be given of this phenomenon, is, that at some period, which the appearance of the trees induces us to fix within twenty years, the rocks from the hill sides have obstructed the narrow pass at the rapids, and caused the river to spread through the woods.


Along the Journey - April 16, 1806
Submerged Forest, ca.1920

The Submerged Forest:
According to Professor John Allen of Portland State University (1983):" Up until the completion of Bonneville Dam in 1938, a ghostly white forest of drowned tree stumps could be observed along both sides of the Columbia River between Cascade Locks and The Dalles. The submerged forest was first mentioned in a geologic textbook in 1853, in 'Principles of Geology' by Sir Charles Lyell: 'Thus Captains Clark and Lewis found, about the year 1807 (sic), a forest of pines standing erect under water in the body of the Columbia RIver, which they supposed, from the appearnace of the trees, to have been submerged only about twenty years.' Both Lewis and Clark in 1805 and Captain Fremont in 1845 recognized that the trees were drowned by the formation of a lake behind a 200-foot landslide dam. Possibly triggered by an earthquake, the dam material slid down from the cliffs of Table Mountain and Greenleaf Peak at a time later determined to be between 1260 and 1290 A.D. The stumps were described in detail by Minnesota biologists Donald B. and Elizabeth G. Lawrence in a series of definitive papers in 1935, 1937, 1937, and 1958. The Lawrences were the first to date the time of the landslide, by caron 14 analyses, as having occurred 700 years before. As of 1936, the Lawrence's counted 3,068 stumps on the south side of the river, and 938 on the north side of the river. The maximum concentration of stumps on the south side occurs just above the mouth of Viento Creek, where more than 800 stumps were counted within a small area.: -- Allen, 1983, Time Travel in Oregon


Penny Postcard, ca.1920, Wind Mountain and the Submerged Forest, click to enlarge
  1. ca.1920, Penny Postcard. Wind Mountain and the Submerged Forest. (Click to enlarge). "Wind Mountain and Submerged Forest, Columbia River. #321, Chas. S. Lipschuetz Company, Portland, Oregon. -- L.Topinka private collection, 2003, used with permission


The mountains which border as far as the Sepulchre rock [Memaloose Island], are high and broken, and its romantic views accasionally enlivened by beautiful cascades rushing from the heights, and forming a deep contrast with the firs, cedars and pines, which darken their sides. From the Sepulchre rock [Memaloose Island], where the low country begins, the long-leafed pine is the almost exclusive growth of timber; but our present camp [Rock Fort, The Dalles, Oregon] is the last spot where a single tree is to be seen on the wide plains, which are now spread before us to the foot of the Rocky mountains [beginning of the Columbia River Plateau]. It is, however, covered with a rich verdure of grass and herbs, some inches in height, which forms a delightful and exhilarating prospect, after being confined to the mountains and thick forests on the seacoast. The climate too, though only on the border of the plains, is here very different from that we have lately experienced. The air is drier and more pure, and the ground itself is as free from moisture as if there had been no rain for the last ten days. ......


Along the Journey - April 16, 1806
Dalles City from the east, 1867

The Dalles, Oregon:
The City of The Dalles is situated in the north-central part of the Oregon on the Columbia River. It is the county seat and the largest community in Wasco County. The Dalles is one of Oregon's most historical cities. Archeological evidence suggests the area have been inhabited more or less continuously for more than 10,000 years. In the 1820s French Canadian boatmen for the British fur trading companies called the two narrow channels of the Columbia ("The Long Narrows" and the "Short Narrows") "La Grand Dalle de la Columbia" and "Les Petites Dalles." "Dalle" meant "flagstones" or "slabs" in French, for the large, smooth slabs of basalt rock that formed the channels in the river. The polished stones reminded them of stones used for paving roads and streets in eastern Canada. The Dalles was the terminus of overland travel for Oregon Trail emigrants until 1846, when the Barlow Road was opened. Camp Drum, opened in 1850 and renamed Fort Dalles in 1853, was manned by mounted riflemen until abandoned in 1867. The City of The Dalles was first incorporated by the Oregon Territorial Government in 1857 as "Dalles City" and was made the county seat shortly thereafter. Despite the official name of "Dalles City", most people, including the United States Post Office, called the town "The Dalles". In 1967 the town's name was officially changed to the "City of The Dalles," conforming to the popular custom. -- City of The Dalles Website, 2004, End of the Oregon Trail Website, 2004, and Washington State Historical Society Website, "Lasting Legacy" Website, 2004.


Map, 1853, Washington and Oregon and the Columbia River, click to enlarge Map, 1854, Columbia River, Hood River to the John Day, click to enlarge Map, 1855, Columbia River, Walla Walla to Vancouver, click to enlarge Map, 1858 Military recon map, The Dalles vicinity, click to enlarge Map, 1858 Military recon map, The Dalles vicinity, click to enlarge Map, 1859, Columbia River, Klickitat River and Fort Dalles, click to enlarge Map, 1887, The Dalles vicinity, click to enlarge Map, 1934 USGS topo map upstream of The Dalles, click to enlarge Map, 1946, The Dalles, Three-Mile Rapids, Big Eddy, Five-Mile Rapids, click to enlarge Map, 1985, The Dalles, The Dalles Dam, Three-Mile Rapids, Big Eddy, Five-Mile Rapids, click to enlarge NASA Image, 1997, Columbia River from The Dalles to Rock Creek, click to enlarge Engraving, 1853, The Dalles and Mount Hood, click to enlarge Stereo Image, 1867, The Dalles, click to enlarge Image, 1867, The Dalles, Oregon, and Mount Hood, from Rockland, Washington, click to enlarge Engraving detail, 1884, The Dalles and Mount Hood, with Mill Creek, click to enlarge Image, 2004, Mount Hood and The Dalles, Oregon
  1. 1853 Map, Washington and Oregon and the Columbia River, from the Clearwater River to the Snake River and down the Columbia River to the Pacific Ocean (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Includes: Clearwater River (Kooskooski), Lapwai Creek (Lapwai R.), Snake River (Saptin or Lewis R.), Columbia River (Columbia R.), Yakima River (Yakima R.), Walla Walla River (Wallawalla R.), Umatilla River (Umatilla R.), Willow Creek (Quesnells R.), John Day River (John day's R.), Deschutes River (Fall R.), Willamette River (Willammette R.), and Cowlitz River (Cowlitz R.). Original Map: "Map of California, Oregon, Washington, Utah, and New Mexico (1853)", by Thomas Cowperthwait & Co. Washington State University Archives #WSU22. -- Washington State University Library Collections Website, 2003
  2. 1853-54 Map, Columbia River, including the Hood River to John Day area (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Includes Hood River (Dog River), Klickitat River (Klikatat R.), Mill Creek (?) (Wasco Ck.), The Dalles, The Deschutes (Wanwauwie or des Chutes R.), the John Day River (Mah hah or John Day's R.), and Rock Creek (Camill Cr.). Original Map: "Rocky Mountains to Puget Sound : from explorations and surveys / made under the direction of the Hon. Jefferson Davis, Secretary of War by Isaac I. Stevens Governor of Washington Territory, 1853-4." Inset: (Supplementary sketch) Reconnaissance of the railroad route from Wallawalla to Seattle via Yak-e-mah River & Snoqualmie Pass. By A. W. Tinkham in January 1854. Drawn by J. R. P. Mechlin. 20 x 28 cm. Topographer, John Lambert, Published in Washington D.C., 1859, 1:1,200,000, Notes: From the U.S. War Department, Explorations and Surveys for a Railroad Route from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean, Topographical Maps, to Illustrate the Various Reports, U.S. Library of Congress American Memories Reference "LC Railroad Maps #156". -- U.S. Library of Congress, American Memories Website, 2004
  3. 1855 Map, Columbia River, including The Dalles (Dalles) (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Original Map: "Map of Oregon and Washington Territories: showing the proposed Northern Railroad route to the Pacific Ocean, by John Disturnell, 1855. University of Washington Archives #UW155. -- University of Washington Library Collections Website, 2002
  4. 1858 Military Recon Map (section of original), Columbia River and The Dalles Vicinity. (Click to enlarge). Map of military reconnaissance from Fort Dalles, Oregon, via Fort Wallah-Wallah, to Fort Taylor, Washington Territory, 1858. Shows approximate location of military road constructed 1859 to 1862. From the report and maps of Captain John Mullan, United States Army, G.P.O., 1863. University of Washington Archives #UW85. -- University of Washington Library Archives Website, 2002
  5. 1858 Military Recon Map, close-in view, downstream (section of original), Columbia River and downstream The Dalles. (Click to enlarge). Map of military reconnaissance from Fort Dalles, Oregon, via Fort Wallah-Wallah, to Fort Taylor, Washington Territory, 1858. Shows approximate location of military road constructed 1859 to 1862. From the report and maps of Captain John Mullan, United States Army, G.P.O., 1863. University of Washington Archives #UW85. -- University of Washington Library Archives Website, 2002
  6. 1859 Map, Columbia River, including the Klickitat River (Klikatat Riv.), Fort Dalles, and the Deschutes River (Fall River) (section of original). (Click to enlarge). Original Map: "Map Exhibiting the Routes between Fort Dalles and the Great Salt Lake", By Bvt.2d Lieut. Joseph Dixon, Topl. Engrs. From Explorations made by him while attached to the Wagon Road Expedition to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake, under the command of Capt. H.D. Wallen, 4th Inft., Compiled under the direction of Capt. Geo. Thom, Topl. Engr., from the orders of Brig. Gen. W.S. Harney commanding the Department of Oregon, 1859. Publisher: Bureau of Topog. Engineers, 1860, UU Library ID: #G4240_1859_D5., Scale: 1:1,300,000. -- University of Utah Library, J.Willard Marriott Digitized Collections Website, 2004
  7. 1887 Map (section of original), Columbia River at The Dalles. (Click to enlarge). Original Map: The Columbia River from Celilo to the mouth showing locations of the salmon fisheries, 1887. Scale ca. 1:375,000, Relief shown by hachures. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Office, G.P.O. 1888. University of Washington Archives #UW128. -- University of Washington Library Archives Website, 2002
  8. 1934 Map (section of original), from The Dalles 1:125,000 topographic quadrangle. (Click to enlarge). The Columbia River at The Dalles, Oregon (the Washington side is not depicted on this map), including Three Mile Rapids, Big Eddy, and Five Mile Rapids. Original map surveyed in 1929-30, contour interval of 50 feet. -- University of Washington Library Collections Website, 2002
  9. 1946 Map (section of original), Columbia River with The Dalles, Three-Mile Rapids, Big Eddy, Five-Mile Rapids. (Click to enlarge). Office of Coast Surveys, Historical Maps and Charts, Columbia River, Bonneville to The Dalles, 1946, Chart#6157, 1:40,000. -- NOAA Office of Coast Survey Website, 2004
  10. 1985 Map (section of original), Columbia River with The Dalles, The Dalles Dam, Three-Mile Rapids, Big Eddy, Five-Mile Rapids. (Click to enlarge). Office of Coast Surveys, Historical Maps and Charts, Columbia River, Bonneville to The Dalles, 1985, Chart#18531, 1:40,000. -- NOAA Office of Coast Survey Website, 2004
  11. 1997, NASA Image, Columbia River from The Dalles to Rock Creek (Click to enlarge). View from space - northeast looking photograph of Columbia River, The Dalles Dam, John Day Dam, Miller Island, Maryhill area, Deschutes River, John Day River, and Rock Creek, 1997. The Columbia River flows upper right (east) to lower left (west). NASA Earth from Space #STS085-734-085. -- NASA Earth from Space Website, 2002
  12. 1853 Engraving, Columbia River area indian camp at The Dalles, Oregon, with Mount Hood in the background. (Click to enlarge). Engraving by John M. Stanley, 1853. From the U.S. War Department's Reports of explorations and surveys to ascertain the most practicable and econmical route for a railroad from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean, 1860, v.12, pt.1, pl.43. University of Washington Libraries Collection, #NA4170. -- University of Washington Libraries Website, 2002
  13. 1867, Stereo view, The Dalles. (Click to enlarge). View from upstream. Caption on image: Dalles City, Columbia River, view from the East. Photographer: Carleton E. Watkins. Photo Date: 1867. University of Washington Stereocard Collection #STE048. -- University of Washington Libraries Collection Website, 2003
  14. 1867, The Dalles, Oregon, and Mount Hood. (Click to enlarge). View from Rockland, Washington (today's Dallesport). Photographer: Carleton Watkins. Oregon Historical Society #21577, #1100-A, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center Catalogue #2001.06.003. -- Columbia Gorge Discovery Center Website, 2004
  15. 1884, Detail from engraving of The Dalles, Oregon with Mount Hood on the skyline and the Columbia River and the mouth of Mill Creek in the foreground. (Click to enlarge). Created by H. Wellge. Published 1884, J.J. Stoner, Madison, Wisconsin. Panoramic view of the city of The Dalles, Oregon, county seat of Wasco County, 1884. Original lithograph shows The Dalles, Mount Hood, the Columbia River, and the mouth of Mill Creek. Reference #LC Panoramic Maps #727. -- Library of Congress American Memories Website, 2002
  16. 2004, Mount Hood and The Dalles, Oregon, as seen from Dallesport, Washington. (Click to enlarge). Copyright © 2004 Lyn Topinka, private archives, used with permission.



Captain Clarke had, in the meantime, been endeavouring to purchase horses, without success, but they promised to trade with him if he would go up to the Skilloot village, above the long narrows. He therefore sent over to us for more merchandise, and then accompanied them in the evening to that place, where he passed the night.

"... About 8 oClock this morning I passed the river with the two interpreters, and nine men in order to trade with the nativs for their horses ... Capt L. sent out the hunters and set several men at work makeing pack saddles ... I formed a Camp on the N. Side and sent Drewyer & Goodrich to the Skillute Village, and Shabono & Frazer down to the Chilluckkitequaw Village with derections to inform the nativs that I had crossed the river for the purpose of purchaseing horses ..." [Clark, April 16, 1806]


Along the Journey - April 16, 1806
The Main Camp - April 15 through April 17, 1806:
Lewis and Clark's set up camp at "Rock Fort", The Dalles, Oregon.


Clark's Camp, April 16, 1806:


Thursday, April 17, 1806
He [Captain Clark] sent to inform us that he was still unable to purchase any horses, but intended going as far as the Eneeshur village to-day, whence he would return to meet us to-morrow at the Skilloot village. In the evening the principal chief of the Chilluckittequaws came to see us, accompanied by twelve of his nation, and hearing that we wanted horses, he promised to meet us at the narrows with some for sale.
"... I rose early after bad nights rest and took my merchindize to a rock which afforded an eligable situation for my purpose ... before precureing the 3 horses I dispatched Crusat, Willard & McNeal and Peter Wiser to Capt Lewis at the Rock fort Camp with a note informing him of my ill suckcess in precureing horses, and advised him to proceed on to this place as soon as possible. that I would in the mean time proceed on to the Enesher National above the Great falls ... in the evening I recved a note from Capt L. by Shannon informing me that he should set out early on tomorrow morning and should proceed up to the bason 2 miles below the Skillute Village ... [Clark, April 17, 1806]


Along the Journey - April 17, 1806
The Main Camp - April 15 through April 17, 1806:
Lewis and Clark's set up camp at "Rock Fort", The Dalles, Oregon.


Clark's Camp, April 17, 1806:



 
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