Volcano Update from Archive



AVO/USGS Volcanic Activity Notice

Volcano: Veniaminof (CAVW #1102-07-)

Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH
Previous Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY

Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE
Previous Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Issued: Thursday, June 13, 2013, 9:49 AM AKDT (20130613/1749Z)
Source: Alaska Volcano Observatory
Notice Number: 2013/A14
Location: N 56 deg 11 min W 159 deg 23 min
Elevation: 8225 ft (2507 m)
Area: Alaska Peninsula Alaska

Volcanic Activity Summary: Elevated surface temperatures observed in satellite images of Veniaminof Volcano this morning at 13:25 UTC (05:25 AKDT) indicate an eruption at the intracaldera cone is likely underway. AVO is thus raising the Aviation Color Code and Volcano Alert Level to ORANGE/WATCH. Seismic tremor continues and is indicative of low-level effusive activity and small explosions. No ash plumes have been observed this morning although clouds have obscured web camera views of the summit.

AVO has been monitoring Veniaminof closely since elevated levels of seismicity became persistent on June 8. Steam plumes issuing from the intracaldera cone have been observed in web camera views since then, but so far no ash emissions have been confirmed.

Recent eruptions of Veniaminof Volcano have all occurred from vents located on the intracaldera cone and were characterized by brief bursts of ash emission and small explosions. Ash plumes associated with this type of activity are typically diffuse and generally do not reach more than 20,000 feet above sea level. Ash fallout is typically limited to the flanks of the volcano. Minor emissions of steam and ash may persist for for weeks to months. The last episode of more energetic activity occurred in 1993-94 when an ash plume rose to about 18,000 feet above sea level and small lava flows poured onto glacier ice around the intracaldera cone. An eruption in 1983-84 produced an ash plume that reached about 25,000 feet above sea level.

Recent Observations:
[Volcanic cloud height] Unknown
[Other volcanic cloud information] Unknown

Contacts: John Power, Scientist-in-Charge, USGS
jpower@usgs.gov (907) 786-7497

Jessica Larsen, Acting Coordinating Scientist, UAFGI
jflarsen@alaska.edu (907) 474-7992

Next Notice: A new VAN will be issued if conditions change significantly or alert levels are modified. While a VAN is in effect, regularly scheduled updates are posted at
http://www.avo.alaska.edu

The Alaska Volcano Observatory is a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys.
(1) VOLCANO OBSERVATORY NOTICE FOR AVIATION (VONA)
(2) Issued:(20130613/1749Z)
(3) Volcano:Veniaminof (CAVW# 1102-07-)
(4) Current Color Code:ORANGE
(5) Previous Color Code:yellow
(6) Source:Alaska Volcano Observatory
(7) Notice Number:2013/A14
(8) Volcano Location:N 56 deg 11 min W 159 deg 23 min
(9) Area:Alaska Peninsula Alaska
(10) Summit Elevation:8225 ft (2507 m)
(11) Volcanic Activity Summary:Elevated surface temperatures observed in satellite images of Veniaminof Volcano this morning at 13:25 UTC (05:25 AKDT) indicate an eruption at the intracaldera cone is likely underway. AVO is thus raising the Aviation Color Code and Volcano Alert Level to ORANGE/WATCH. Seismic tremor continues and is indicative of low-level effusive activity and small explosions. No ash plumes have been observed this morning although clouds have obscured web camera views of the summit.

AVO has been monitoring Veniaminof closely since elevated levels of seismicity became persistent on June 8. Steam plumes issuing from the intracaldera cone have been observed in web camera views since then, but so far no ash emissions have been confirmed.

Recent eruptions of Veniaminof Volcano have all occurred from vents located on the intracaldera cone and were characterized by brief bursts of ash emission and small explosions. Ash plumes associated with this type of activity are typically diffuse and generally do not reach more than 20,000 feet above sea level. Ash fallout is typically limited to the flanks of the volcano. Minor emissions of steam and ash may persist for for weeks to months. The last episode of more energetic activity occurred in 1993-94 when an ash plume rose to about 18,000 feet above sea level and small lava flows poured onto glacier ice around the intracaldera cone. An eruption in 1983-84 produced an ash plume that reached about 25,000 feet above sea level.

(12) Volcanic cloud height:Unknown
(13) Other volcanic cloud information:Unknown
(14) Contacts:John Power, Scientist-in-Charge, USGS
jpower@usgs.gov (907) 786-7497

Jessica Larsen, Acting Coordinating Scientist, UAFGI
jflarsen@alaska.edu (907) 474-7992
(15) Next Notice:A new VONA will be issued if conditions change significantly or alert levels are modified. While a VONA is in effect, regularly scheduled updates are posted at
http://www.avo.alaska.edu